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Event Schedule

Thursday, October 22, 2015

TimeSessionLocation
8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration & Breakfast Tivoli-Adirondacks
(TV 440)
9:00 am - 10:40 am Pre-Symposium Workshop #1 Tivoli-Adirondacks
(TV 440)
11:00 am - 11:40 am Pre-Symposium Workshop #2 Tivoli-Adirondacks 
(TV 440)
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Registration & Lunch Tivoli-Adirondacks 
(TV 440)
1:00 pm - 3:40 pm Pre-Symposium Workshop #3 Tivoli-Adirondacks 
(TV 440)
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm Registration & Welcome Social Auraria Library,
Discovery Wall
5:00 pm -7:00 pm Film Screening Auraria Library,
Discovery Wall

Friday, October 23, 2015

TimeSessionLocation
8:00 am - 5:00 pm Registration Tivoli Turnhalle
(TV 250)
8:00 am - 9:00 am Breakfast Tivoli Turnhalle 
(TV 250)
9:00 am - 9:40 am Opening Panel Tivoli Turnhalle 
(TV 250)
10:00 am - 10:40 am Concurrent Sessions 1 Student Success Building
(SSB 2nd Floor)
11:00 am - 11:40 am Concurrent Sessions 2 Student Success Building
(SSB 2nd Floor)
12:00 pm - 1:45 pm Lunch & Keynote Tivoli Turnhalle
(TV 250)
2:00 pm - 2:40 pm Concurrent Sessions 3 Student Success Building
(SSB 2nd Floor)
3:00 pm - 3:40 pm Concurrent Sessions 4 Student Success Building
(SSB 2nd Floor)
4:00 pm - 4:40pm Concurrent Sessions 5 Student Success Building
(SSB 2nd Floor)
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Café Pédagogique  Tivoli Brewing Co.
(TV 240)

Detailed Event Schedule Thursday, October 22nd

Pre-Symposium Workshops

WorkshopRoom

Promoting Student Success and Engagement in Hybrid Course Design

Hosted by: Myron Anderson, MSU Denver; Meredith Flynn, MSU Denver; Michael Kolb, MSU Denver

TV 440
   

Games in the Classroom: The Why, The What, and The How

Hosted by: Roberta Calderaro, CCD

TV 440
   

Just in Time Teaching (JiTT)

Hosted by: Jeff Loats, MSU Denver

TV 440
   

Most Likely To Succeed

Hosted by: Brian Sevier, MSU Denver, 5:00 pm

Library

 


Detailed Event Schedule Friday, October 23rd

9:00 am - 9:40 am | Opening Panel

PresentationRoom

Just in Time Teaching: A Strategy for Success (JITT)

Presenters: Arlene Sgoutas, MSU Denver; Jeff Loats, MSU Denver; Courtney Rocheleau, MSU Denver; Randi Smith, MSU Denver

TV 250

Abstract

Just-in-Time Teaching, or JiTT, is an accessible, easy-to-implement teaching strategy that increases students’ preparation for class, thereby allowing for more rich and meaningful discussions, demonstrations, and deliberations during class time. Students are held accountable for reading course material and responding to online active reading assignments (or “warm-ups”), which are due shortly before class. The course instructor, in turn, is accountable for reading the student warm-ups "just in time" to adjust the classroom lesson to suit the students' needs. Unlike many other active reading assignments, JiTT uses a feedback loop – formed by the students' outside-of-class preparation and the instructor’s in-class responsiveness to that advanced preparation – to fundamentally affect what happens during the subsequent in-class time together. Presenters will share their results adapting JiTT to courses across disciplines within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities by sharing outcome data from their research on this blended learning tool.

 

 

10:00 am - 10:40 am | Concurrent Session 1

PresentationRoom

Concept Mapping in the Cloud

Presenter: Susan Zvacek, University of Denver

201

 Abstract

Initially developed in the 1970s as an instructional activity by Joseph Novak, researchers in a variety of fields, working with learners of all ages, continue to study the tools, implementation strategies, and learning outcomes related to the use of concept maps. Novak, in particular, was especially interested in their value for activating prior knowledge and enhancing the intentional relationships among important ideas, as opposed to the type of rote learning that occurs when concepts are introduced randomly or without clear ties to what the student has already integrated into his or her cognitive frameworks (Zvacek, 2013). Much of the recent research is focused on exploring learners’ analytical skills, synthesis of ideas, and interpretation of phenomena or trends when engaging in concept mapping activities (see, for example, Ummels et al, 2015 and Akbari, 2014). This presentation will include a brief discussion of the educational value of concept mapping followed by a demonstration of CMap Cloud software, a freely-available tool for concept map creation and sharing.

 
   

PowerPoint as Pedagogy, Not Punishment

Presenter: Rich Kessel, MSU Denver

202

 Abstract

PowerPoint has become ubiquitous in the classroom as both a tool for instructors and a source of notes for students. While everyone bemoans “Death by PowerPoint,” research at the intersection of pedagogy and neuroscience has acknowledged the value of slideware when used appropriately. But what is appropriate for learning? This session will offer practical advice for creating impactful compliments to your pedagogy. For example, cognitive load theory suggests that only one of three things should happen when you advance a slide, and the transfer principle suggests your students think your information is as tired and boring as your standard trite PowerPoint theme. Because slideware is a teaching tool, not a teacher, asking for my slides instead of attending this “class” will give you less than 10% of the most useful and beneficial ways to use PowerPoint in your lecture.

 
   

No Magic Required: Producing an Out-of-Lecture-Experience in your Courses

Presenter: Lisha Bustos, University of Colorado

203

 Abstract

Research has shown that lecture is not the best instructional technique. Yet, in practice, we fall back into lecture mode because it is just so convenient, so comfortable, so familiar. The question we’ll pose: How do we break away from this and embrace an enchanting world that doesn’t revolve around lecture? This discussion will begin by highlighting our last two semesters where a determined effort to convert our faculty produced some bewitching and spellbinding experiences. Whether it required a fundamental shift in the role of the instructor, a startling new technique like Just-in-Time-Teaching, or a simple twist on the current lecture format, we would love to hear your stories and brainstorm better ways to deliver content.

 
   

Avoiding the Kobayashi Maryu OR a Shared Vision to Transform an Institution

Presenters: Sam Spiegel, Colorado School of Mines; Michael Erickson, Colorado School of Mines

204

 Abstract

Instructional technology (IT) requires support and vision from multiple points across an institution. The Center for Innovative Teaching & Learning (CITL) and Computing, Communications & Information Technologies (CCIT), are in the early stages of organizing and collaborating around IT with the intent to advance the quality of students’ learning experiences and supporting faculty use of empirically proven innovative teaching approaches, including appropriate technologies, at the Colorado School of Mines. Join us as we share our initial plans, early reactions from faculty and administration, and engage all who attend the session in an active discussion. Come share your efforts and experiences in cross-institutional collaboration in how to best motivate and support faculty in rich and effective use of IT (so we can all avoid the “no win” situation).

 
   

Creating an Information and Technology Literacy Outcome

Presenters: Kae Novak, Front Range Community College; Krystan Grant, Front Range Community College

205

 Abstract

This session will outline the two year research and iterative process that Front Range Community College took to develop an information and technology literacy student learning outcome as part of its faculty led assessment and accreditation program. Participants will receive an overview of information and technology literacy, its impact in education, and how it is now being incorporated into the culture of the college. The Information and Technology Literacy student outcome is the result of an extensive development process that involved reviewing information literacy and technology literacy research, the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Information Literacy and Competency Standards for Higher Education as well as the International Society for Technology in Education Standards. The information and technology literacy outcome at Front Range Community College assesses the student’s incorporation of traditional academic sources, social media, and the ability of students to use transmedia or move between multiple platforms. Based on phenomenographic research on information literacy (Bruce, 2000; Lloyd & Williamson, 2007; Andretta, 2007; Yates, Partridge & Bruce, 2012), the campus wide learning outcomes does not privilege one form of media, technology or network and recognizes that credibility is key. By the end of the session, participants will understand how one college developed and is now integrating an information and technology outcome for use across its curriculum.

 
   

Enhancing Student's Achievement by Interactive Virtual Learning Environment

Presenters: Mohammed Khojah, University of Colorado - Denver; Yazan Alnsour, University of Colorado - Denver

206

 Abstract

The advancement in technology allowed several innovative applications to be produced and used specially in the education field. Students have more choices to acquire knowledge than before. On the other hand, universities are striving to increase the effectiveness of education and reduce the costs at the same time. Universities are adopting the online education as a way to reach distant students and preserve the cost associated with traditional education method. However, the number of students in online courses is increasing and the need to adopt effective solutions to provide distant learning for those students is vital (Huynah, Umesh & Valacich, 2003). Many learning tools have been introduced to serve as a bridge between students and knowledge. Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a technology-based software that helps students to achieve more knowledge. The type of learning environment in this study is interactive and we are defining it as an Interactive Virtual Learning Environment (IVLE). We are interested in raising the question “are the IVLEs more effective to teach about computer-related courses than traditional classroom lectures?” Our study is investigating the relationship between using the IVLE and achievements of students. Also, the study is investigating the level of engagement of students. We are expecting that IVLE tools are more effective and engaging than the traditional learning process. The results of this research will help universities to make the right decision of adopting such technologies. Also, the results will assure students that the online course option is at least as effective as the traditional learning option if it is not even better.

 

 


11:00 am - 11:40 am Concurrent Session 2

PresentationRoom

Using Hybrid Learning for Course Standardization and Collaborative Teaching

Presenter: Scott Toney, University of Denver

201

 Abstract

How does Hybrid Delivery facilitate instruction from 10 professors across 17 sections of the same course (this fall alone)? Hybrid Course Delivery is often talked about in terms of flexibility for students and instructors. Research focuses on how similar the outcomes are between Hybrid and Face to Face courses (often with hybrid having better outcomes). This presentation will detail how hybrid delivery methods helped standardize the delivery of a 700 + student a year introductory business course at the same time it enhanced collaboration between subject matter experts as teachers in the course. Breaking out a single course into 12 “Centers of Excellence” (online modules) allows 10 subject matter experts to each teach their favorite material to all the students that take DU’s “Gateway to Business” course. This talk will detail how: Every student gets instruction from the most qualified faculty member for a given subject. In class exercises are facilitated by different instructors with the guidance of the subject matter experts. Consistent projects are assigned across all sections. Assessment shifts from 2 high stakes exams to mastery of material on a week by week basis. Faculty are given incentives to be course presenters and center of excellence owners.

 
   

Utilizing Blended Learning in Course Redesign

Presenter: Cynthia Lindquist, MSU Denver

202

 Abstract

Walsh (2013) has acknowledged the teaching profession has changed because students have changed. Teachers need to recognize that students do not learn how we learned and that students have access to more information at any moment than what most of us had during all of our years as students. The New Media Consortium Horizon Report 2015 K-12 Edition (Johnson, Adams Becker, Estrada & Freeman, 2015) examined emerging trends and technologies that will potentially drive educational change in schools worldwide. One trend noted was the increased use of blended learning, drawing from the best practices in online and face-to-face methods. The report affirmed, “When designed and implemented effectively, hybrid models allow students to practice and achieve mastery of content at their own pace via online learning modules and adaptive software. Teachers are then freed up to focus on small groups of students who need more support to succeed” (p. 16). In redesigning a service course SED 3600: Exceptional Learners in the Classroom, the presenter examined the use of blended/hybrid learning in an effort to improve the course and more effectively meet the needs of teacher licensure students. All licensure students in teacher education are required to take this “introduction to special education” course. Currently this course is offered in two formats: as a face-to-face course or an online course. Students have found the online sections challenging and a number of students have struggled to successfully complete the class in this format. The course was redesigned as a blended learning/hybrid course and provides materials that can be used by other faculty members teaching the course as well as affiliate faculty. The presenter will provide information on how this course was redesigned using a data driven approach and backward design from learning objectives to enacting the course.

 
   

Zap! (tion) Making Video Valuable

Presenter: Cory Pavicich, University of Colorado - Boulder

203

 Abstract

As the role of video grows in online and hybrid teaching, students continue to be lulled into submission by endless hours of passive video content. In 2015, the CU Boulder College of Engineering redesigned the video content in a massive hybrid course using the tool Zaption. Zaption allows instructors and designers to embed questions, discussions, open response fields, and other engagement tools directly onto video, and (in some cases) pull those assessments automatically into a grade book. This session will focus on the use of Zaption to improve student learning through open, online video in hybrid and flipped classrooms, as well as how to design your own videos to work with active, embedded assessments.

 
   

Teaching Difficult and/or Taboo Topics Online

Presenter: Katherine Martinez, MSU Denver

204

 Abstract

Teaching a course that requires students feel challenged and engaged at the same time can be a difficult task. Even more difficult is teaching a course about taboo topics (e.g., violence and sexuality) that may make students feel uncomfortable or anxious. This is why many faculty who teach these courses often do not consider moving the course content online; they want to address student discomfort and anxiety as it arises and feel this is more manageable in the classroom. However, there are ways to effectively build online courses relating to challenging and taboo topics that allow for the students and faculty to feel at ease and even excited. In this presentation I will take you through the steps of building the online course, “Multicultural Study of Sexualities and Genders,” for Metropolitan State University of Denver. This 1000-level course introduces students to Gender and Sexuality Studies with an emphasis on the intersectionality of racial/ethnic, class, and national identities in the U.S. It challenges students to think beyond simplistic binaries and thus challenges them to deconstruct their own identities and experiences. Through the use of private journals, students reflect on their personal experiences without publicly outing themselves. Alternatively, students discuss the general complications of identity visibilities and invisibilities in class forums. In these ways, the students engage with the taboo topics while still maintaining their comfort around the identities they wish to keep private. Ultimately, this course will serve as a reference for future online sexuality courses in the Institute for Women’s Studies and Services at MSU Denver.

 
   

How to Make Your Class Memorable With Visual Media

Presenter: Michael McMahon, MSU Denver

205

 Abstract

As technology changes so do the ways we interact. We can join this technological revolution and gain measurable results – and quickly. A great many people on the street can be asked a 4th grade science question and not know the answer, but if you ask them about a movie they may quote the whole thing. There is something to be said about that. Visual media should be staple in education: in the classroom and especially online. Let’s get their attention and keep it by learning how to incorporate fun and engaging multimedia elements to bring a visual narrative to our curriculum. Take Away: Learn how you can use video to: Captivate your audience. Immerse your audience into the learning experience. Transform the way you interact with your students. Learn how you can use multimedia to: Help your students enjoy and maintain subject matter. Create an interactive portal. Learn how you can use video to: Get motivated about your own teaching experience. Get the results you want.

Learn how you can use video to: Get motivated about your own teaching experience.Get the results you want.

 

Designing a Mobile Ready Course Using Universal Design

Presenters: Kate Miller, University of Colorado - Denver; Corey Edwards, University of Colorado - Boulder

206

 Abstract

With over two million students identifying as having a disability, designing content with Universal Design is imperative. Furthermore, with 37 percent of student preferring to access content on their mobile devices ensuring content is accessible becomes paramount for successful learning. Come learn and implement design tips for creating mobile friendly and accessible content (many of which can be applied to course design in general). Key points: Overview on why designing accessible content matters Discuss nine tips for better course design to make content more accessible Review different scenarios to determine if content is accessible

 

 


3:00 pm - 3:40 pm | Concurrent Session 4

PresentationRoom

Clickers: An Effective Way to Motivate and Engage Students in Courses

Presenter: Tamar Goulet, University of Mississippi

201

 Abstract

Students are often hesitant to speak in class fearing that they may not know the correct answer or that their opinion be ridiculed. Furthermore, in classes with large student enrollment, it is practically impossible to obtain answers from all that are present. A specific technology, clickers, can expand possibilities of teaching and learning both during class and during exams. Clickers are handheld devices that transmit responder answers to a receiver connected to a computer. In a matter of 30 seconds or less, the answers of even hundreds of students are recorded and can be displayed, in multiple viewing formats, on the screen. Clickers with alphanumeric capabilities further diversify the questions that can be posed. Session attendees will be introduced to multiple ways one can effectively use clickers in their class and during testing. Attendees will experience firsthand how clickers work by answering various questions, via alphanumeric clickers, throughout the session.

 
   

Active + Collaborative = Learning: and Online Approach

Presenter: John Heisel, Front Range Community College

202

 Abstract

Active learning is when experiences stimulate mental activities that lead to meaningful learning. This workshop will present the effectiveness of combining these theories online by utilizing multiple forms of media (transmedia). Examples will be provided and solicited in this interactive presentation.

 
   

Characteristics of Effective Multimedia for Teaching: Applying Cognitive Theories of Multimedia Learning to Complex Content

Presenters: Ann Morrison, MSU Denver; Michaela Clemens, MSU Denver; Elizabeth McClellan Ribble, MSU Denver

203

 Abstract

The present study tests the impact of six multimedia presentation designs on participants’ comprehension and situational interest (SI) of complex ethical and regulatory concepts. Designed based principles of the cognitive theory of multimedia learning (CTML) and the cognitive-affective theory of learning with media (CATLM), the six conditions differ in their use of visual attention cuing, verbal or printed information delivery, and the simultaneous or serial presentation of information. Participants are shown one of six randomized multimedia presentations and then asked ten questions in which they apply the information from the presentation which measure comprehension. Six additional questions measure SI. TLT conference session participants will be exposed to CTML and CATLM with discussion on their application to information presentation in higher education. This study is currently in progress, however preliminary data from 300 participants and the potential outcomes will be shared, with an emphasis on the implications for effective university teaching with multimedia.

 
   

The Yin and Yang of Online and Traditional Curriculum

Presenter: Bob Farmer, MSU Denver

204

 Abstract

This paper explores the interactive dynamics of online and traditional upper level education and the exciting opportunities that exist, as these two education methods are viewed as complimentary and horizontally connected to one another versus separate and vertical delivery systems. Have you, as a higher education professor, ever contemplated the Yin and Yang of online and traditional curriculum? Many students and instructors view the value of online and traditional curriculum in ways that are frequently opposite or contrary to one another. In reality, online and traditional curriculum offers an education dynamic that can be complementary, interconnected, and interdependent in the manner in which they can be structured, delivered, and how they support and interrelate to one another. These seemingly different approaches to upper level instruction and learning can effectively interact with one another in a dynamic manner with one another and in balance of one another. Each approach to higher education has aspects that may differ and complement one another depending on varying criteria and instructor bias and purpose. The Yin Yang symbol (taijitu symbol) asks us to reflect on the balance between what may often be perceived to be two opposites. Yet, as a whole the Yin and Yang symbol cause the discerning academic to look beyond the perceived two opposites and to look at the whole, when contemplating the interactive value of blended learning in the online and traditional classroom environments.

 
   

Asking the Right Questions, Making the Right Decisions: Selecting Accessible Web-Based Learning Tools

Presenter: Aisha Jackson, The University of Colorado Boulder

205

 Abstract

Although there are a plethora of web-based learning tools faculty can select from, not all of them will help students learn. There are a number of reasons for this - from the way the course was designed, to the strategies that were used to integrate the technology. This session will focus on one particular component that can impact student learning - accessibility. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: describe issues that poorly designed web-based learning tools cause when being accessed by assistive technologies, list core questions to ask vendors related to the accessibility of their tools, and make informed decisions when selecting academic technologies.

 
   

Expanding Possibilities: Blogging and Vlogging; Turning Students into Online Journalists

Presenter: Jenn Zukowski, University of Denver

206

 Abstract

Assigning blog posts and/or videos instead of short papers as reading responses give students a venue to open their scholarship into the global classroom. This presentation will show how blogging and vlogging stimulate student writing while encouraging students to synthesize readings effectively, retain information, present themselves as commenters and writers, and express themselves via technology.

 

 


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