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#RoadrunnerGratitude

Show your friends, students, and colleagues some rowdy appreciation!

GratitudeTree

Here’s how it works:

  • Between November 26th and December 21st, visit one of our four locations!

1. Head to the main entrance of:

  1. Jordan Student Success Building,
  2. Plaza Building,
  3. The Admin Building or the
  4. Southeast entrance of West Classroom.

2. Fill out a gratitude leaf for a friend, colleague or student.

3. Hang the leaf onto a branch.

4. Share a photo of the note on Twitter or Instagram using #RoadrunnerGratitude.

  • You can also use an Instagram sticker on your story.

Encourage that person to share in the spirit and fun by visiting a tree themselves!

 

The Gratitude Trees are sponsored by the Welcome Desk, Roadways Peer Mentors, Student Activities, Human Resources and the Council of Administrators. It will run until Dec. 21st.


Collaborate online using our Padlet virtual gratitude tree! This is an easy way to show gratitude in an interactive way online. Just head here.

  • Start a gratitude journal. Write 3-5 things that you are grateful for and try to be specific. For example, rather than saying, “I’m grateful for my family”, say, I’m grateful that my parents flew in from Maine to be here for my son’s first trick-or-treating experience.”
  • Start your meeting by showing gratitude to your colleagues.
  • Express gratitude to the people in your lives with a little note, a card, a token, or just your words. Be specific as to exactly what you’re grateful for.
  • Focus on what you have, not on what you don’t have. Focus on the things that are going well and be appreciative. Things could be worse.
  • Take the time to be grateful over your adversities and how much you’ve grown.
  • Open a meeting with gratitude expressions around the table.  We can bring you supplies.
  • Write a personal handwritten letter or a note.
  • Use an app— ex. Act Coach.
  • Send your first email of the day as a gratitude.
  • Send a thank you to a faculty member who’s class you enjoyed.
  • Send a thank you to someone who defies the roadrunner runaround.
  • Build your own gratitude tradition in your office or department (jar, shout-out wall).
  • Find gratitude in your own adversity.
  • Do a random act of kindness.
  • Gratitude walk/mindfulness.
  • Learn about ways others like to be recognized (publicly vs. privately, with items, with words, with free time, etc).  Appreciation language

Alexis Karris Bachik, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology