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Course Descriptions

 

GEG 1000 – World Regional Geography

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment placement tests

Description: This course presents the study of the formation, behavior, and interaction of social, political, cultural, and economic regions throughout the world.

General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I, Global Diversity

Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS2

 

GEG 1100 – Introduction to Physical Geography

Credits: 3

Description: This course explores the various elements of the physical environment and interactions between the elements. The course emphasizes the atmosphere (weather and climate), the lithosphere (soils, geology, and landforms), and the hydrosphere (oceans, streams, and groundwater).

General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC2

 

GEG 1120 – Orienteering

Credits: 1

Description: This course familiarizes students with the reading and interpretation of topographic maps and the use of the compass. Orienteering exercises are conducted in the field.

 

GEG 1300 – Introduction to Human Geography

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment placement tests

Description: This course provides an introduction to geographic perspectives, concepts, and methods as they apply to the study of human activities. Emphasis is placed on explaining human spatial patterns and their consequences. Topics covered include population, migration, language, religion, folk and economic development, political systems, and resources.

General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I, Global Diversity

Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS2

 

GEG 1610 – Introduction to Planning

Credits: 1

Description: This course provides an overview of the role of planning in land use, different types of planning processes, public and private sector actors, skills required of planners, and planning documents and maps.

 

GEG 1910 – Global Water Concerns

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing placement tests

Description: In this course, water is examined as a natural and societal resource using local, national, and intemational examples. Landforms and processes related to water such as the hydrologic cycle, watersheds, surface water, and groundwater are surveyed. Students leam about water use in early civilizations, water and culture, water quality and treatment, and water law. The critical issue of water conservation and scarcity is reviewed in the context of the social, legal, political, economic, and physical infrastructure that controls water around the world.

General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences, Global Diversity

 

GEG 1920 – Concepts and Connections in Geography

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment tests

Description: This course introduces the basic concepts and themes of geography, covering both physical and cultural aspects of the Earth’s surface. Students will develop the analytical skills to understand how people shape and are shaped by their environment. The course examines how the human experience and human activity create and sustain places; how climates, land forms, and water processes shape the earth’s surface; the interconnections between physical and cultural phenomena; and how this knowledge relates to everyday life.

General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I

Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC2

 

GEG 2020 – Geography of Colorado

Credits: 3

Description: Geography of Colorado presents the study of the physical, economic, and cultural features of Colorado. These features include climate, landforms, history, water resources, energy and minerals, mining, soil, natural vegetation, agriculture, population characteristics, the economy, current issues, as well as their interactions, and the overall geographic setting.

General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I

Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS2

 

GEG 2200 – Geography of the United States

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of earth science courses

Description: This course is a survey of the geography of the U.S., including an overview of the physical characteristics, landforms, climate, soil, vegetation, and natural resources. Regions of the U.S. are studied, including the distribution of population, agriculture, industry, transportation, and culture. Geographic problems and issues are raised.

 

GEG 2300 – Geographic Analysis of Social Issues

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 1300

Description: This course is a geographic analysis of current social issues. Topics include urban spatial problems such as crowding and crime, drugs and gangs, population growth, environmental perception, resource use, and culturally based land-use patterns. The administration of space, boundaries, territoriality, and spatial learning are discussed.

 

GEG 3000 – Historical Geography of the U.S.

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of geography or permission of instructor; GEG 1300, GEG 2200, or HIS 1210 recommended

Description: This course examines the unique interrelationships between geography and history. Topics covered include frontiers and boundaries, settlement patterns, environmental perception, sequent occupancy, changing land-use practices, migration, and urban growth. Further, the course addresses the interrelationships between different physical environments and cultural landscapes.

 

GEG 3300 – Land Use, Culture, and Conflict

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): ENV 1400 or NAS 1000 or PSC 1010 and at least junior standing

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to theories, approaches, and controversies concerning use of land and resources on Indian Reservations. Reading and discussion will be directed toward questions related to differing views on land use and resources, how modernization impacts traditional settings, as well as treaties and governmental policies that govern Indian land. Case studies which illustrate current conflict/resolution issues between Native Americans and other actors such as federal, state and local governments will be examined.

Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

University Requirement(s): Multicultural

Cross Listed Course(s): NAS 3300, PSC 3300

 

GEG 3360 – Economic Geography

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 1300

Description: This course investigates the “economic landscape” and analyzes global patterns of spatial interdependence in a systems framework. Spatial economic models are examined through case studies and class exercises. The relationships between human activity and land-use patterns are examined in a world/regional context.

 

GEG 3520 – Regional Geography: Variable Topics

Credits: 2-3

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of earth science courses Specific regions of the world will be selected for in-depth study

Description: Topics will include physical and cultural geography, demographics, economic activity, urbanization, political geography, and environmental issues.

Note: The course may be repeated for credit as a different region is studied.

 

GEG 3600 – Urban Geography

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 1300

Description: This course examines theories of urban development and factors that affect urbanization, such as demographic change, annexation, zoning, and infrastructure development. Models of urban land use are examined in the context of cities in the United States. Students learn how to prepare and analyze census-tract maps.

 

GEG 3610 – Principles of Land Use Planning

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3600

Description: In this course students learn basic land-use planning concepts and how to analyze land-use patterns, interpret land-use maps, and analyze existing land-use plans. Further, students learn how to collect relevant data, prepare a comprehensive land-use plan, and predict future planning issues. Special attention is paid to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in land-use planning.

 

GEG 3630 – Transportation Planning and Land Use

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3610, six additional hours of geography

Description: This course is an analysis of transportation systems as they relate to other types of land use. Transportation networks are examined in terms of types, patterns, and densities. Consideration is given to alternative transportation systems as they relate to energy savings, pollution prevention, and the reduction of congestion.

 

GEG 3700 – Urban Sustainability

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3600 and GEG 3610

Description: This course examines the relationship between urbanization and sustainability. It analyzes the opportunities and challenges of cities to initiate, foster and manage the pace of change needed to transition to sustainability. It evaluates how cities throughout the world are planning for sustainability and reducing their carbon footprint and, in doing so, learning how to foster change in local contexts. The course also provides students with the professional tools to identify and learn how sustainable urban planning practices generated in dynamic U.S. and international contexts can be adapted to different urban local settings to find creative ways to transition to urban sustainability.

 

GEG 3720 – Global Sustainable Development

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3360

Description: This course surveys the sustainability concept and sustainable development practices focusing on: economic growth and environmental degradation, the overuse of resources and the generation of waste, and the effectiveness of environment protection and environmental justice. It examines the environmental implications of production systems, consumption patterns, and waste generation in the global north as well as poverty and exclusion in the global south. It reviews the evolution of sustainability and sustainable development as major policy-making paradigms for addressing the tension between economic development and environmental protection. The course also examines the technocentric approach to environmental degradation and other
alternative approaches that emphasize justice, socio/economic equity and ecological responsibility.

 

GEG 3920 – Directed Study in Geography

Credits: 2-6

Prerequisite(s): Departmental or instructor permission

Description: This course provides an opportunity for upper-division students to conduct a specific project in the field of Geography. Students may develop a unique undergraduate research project or assist with a research project initiated by a faculty member. The faculty advisor guides each. The course requires permission of the instructor to enroll. Students may not receive more than 9 hours of credit for this course and the previous courses titled “Directed Study in Land Use.”

 

GEG 4020 – Field Experience in Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): EDS 3140

Corequisite(s): HIS 4010

Description: This field-based course provides opportunities to develop teacher candidates’ professional and pedagogical skills in a Social Studies classroom. In coordination with the classroom teacher, teacher candidates will design and implement content lessons, use content strategies to improve both information acquisition and literacy skills, and adjust instruction for students with diverse needs. Course assignments and evaluations are designed to help teacher candidates become reflective practitioners.

Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GEG or HIS.

Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 4020

 

GEG 4610 – Urban and Regional Planning

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3610

Description: This course studies the philosophy and scope of urban and regional planning and the principles and factors of planning and their interrelationships.

 

GEG 4620 – Residential Land Use Patterns

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3600 or GEG 3610 or six hours of urban studies courses

Description: This course examines spatial patterns of urban growth, factors that affect housing, the role of nonprofit developers in the current housing market, as well as theories that explain the residential mosaic of North American cities. It includes an analysis of current housing trends as well as the housing types, densities, patterns and geographic distribution, as well as the interrelationships with other aspects of the urban environment, including infrastructure.

 

GEG 4640 – Recreational Land Use Patterns

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3610 or Permission of instructor

Description: This course considers various types of recreation space, including greenbelts; open space; wilderness areas; and national, state and local parks. It relates recreational land to the land-use planning process, as well as the environmental impacts of recreation.

 

GEG 4700 – Sustainability in Resource Management

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 3720

Description: This course traces the evolution of current thought and practice in the environmental debate of resources. It reviews the politics of resource management as it relates to a broader set of issues about economic development, sustainability, and social equity. It examines the environmental and social effects associated with development of specific land-based resources. Topics covered include consumerism, the growth economy, global climate change, hydropolitics, food systems and agriculture, deforestation, warfare, and ecological and human impacts of environmental degradation. The course provides a framework to examine the politics of resource management and environmental policy and how contending approaches and practices impact human development and environments.

 

GEG 4710 – Legal Aspects of Land Use

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): ENV 4010 or GEG 3610 or Permission of instructor

Description: This course studies the laws, ordinances, and regulations related to land use, as well as the role of federal, state, and local government in regulating and controlling land use. The course makes use of case studies and local issues.

 

GEG 4720 – Sustainability in Mitigation Planning

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 1100 and GEG 3610, ENV 4010 recommended

Description: This course studies the principles of community emergency planning and hazard mitigation to reduce the longterm risks and impact of natural hazards on local communities. It acknowledges that natural hazards such as floods, storms, and earthquakes cannot be prevented; their risks to life and property can be greatly reduced through advance mitigation planning that reduces or eliminates long-term risks of natural hazard vulnerability. It recognizes that natural-environmental hazards are inextricably intertwined with sustainable development. The course reviews how sustainable community development that improves social equity while minimizing environmental damage reduces the vulnerability of a community to natural disasters. The course provides the
required skills to design a strategic program to elaborate a hazard mitigation plan for local communities.

 

GEG 4950 – Internship in Geography

Credits: 2-15

Prerequisite(s): Departmental or instructor permission

Description: This course provides an on-the-job internship experience with a geography-related company or agency. The experience must be done under qualified supervision and under the direction of an Earth and Atmospheric Sciences faculty member. Students may not receive more than 15 hours of credit for this course and the previous course titled “Internship in Land Use.”

 

GEG 4970 – Sustainability Practice Seminar

Credits: 3

Prerequisite(s): GEG 4700 and 12 hours of upper-division courses in natural and/or social science or written permission of instructor; completion of all SBS I and II and Natural and Physical Sciences General Studies course requirements, senior standing.

Description: This course is a senior-level, capstone seminar for EAS students addressing the issue of how to integrate the environmental, social, and economic dimensions of sustainability into decision-making, project development, and assessment. The primary purpose of the course is to develop the knowledge and skills required to evaluate sustainable proposals and existing sustainable practices and to develop new alternatives for problem-solving. Topics covered include sustainable planning for climate change and adaptation to water scarcity. The pedagogic strategy of this course is to provide students with a grounded, hands-on experience in the practice of sustainability assessment.

University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


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