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Studio Art Courses for Non-Art Majors

The Art Department offers the following Studio Art courses for non-majors. Not all courses will be offered every semester. Art majors may not apply these courses to major requirements.

 

ART 1212 - Non-Majors Ceramics: Handbuilding

This course introduces students to the basic hand-building techniques and technical knowledge required to work and fire ceramics. Students develop both a conceptual understanding and practical knowledge of the ways in which three-dimensional ceramic form functions. Lectures and visual presentations explore historical and contemporary approaches to ceramics. This course is restricted to non-Art majors.

 

ART 1213 - Non-Majors Ceramics: Wheelthrowing

This ceramics course focuses on wheel throwing as an expressive tool with which students develop their ceramic techniques of thrown and altered forms. Students investigate traditional vessel making, as well as thrown and altered sculptural and functional objects. Topics of study include contemporary and historical wheel-thrown objects and an introduction to high-fire, atmospheric firing. This course is restricted to non-Art majors.

 

ART 1251 - Jewelry and Metals for Non-Art Majors

This course explores traditional and contemporary approaches to the creation of handcrafted jewelry and precious or semiprecious metal objects. The course will introduce basic casting and fabricating techniques such as hollow construction and surface embellishment. This course is restricted to non-Art majors.

 

ART 1261 - Painting for Non-Art Majors

This course explores acrylic painting techniques and materials. Students study composition, the use of color, and design elements and principles. This course is restricted to non-Art majors.

 

ART 1271 - Film Photography for Non-Majors

This course introduces basic photographic problem solving focused on technical and aesthetic concerns while addressing the history of photography. Students learn black and white film exposure, development and printing. This course is restricted to non-art majors.

 

ART 1273 - Digital Capture for Non-Art Majors

This course introduces basic digital photographic strategies for image making focused on technical and aesthetic concerns while addressing how photographic images function in visual culture. Students learn image capture, fundamentals of basic camera functions, processing, manipulation and printing of digital image files, and maintenance and archiving of a digital archive. Contemporary photography topics are integrated into the curriculum through assignments and related independent research. This course is restricted to non-art majors.

 

ART 190I - Printmaking for Non-Art Majors

Students in this course develop knowledge and skills of traditional and contemporary fine art printmaking processes through a series of projects that address creative development and technical skills. Students employ a variety of methods and materials to produce editioned and one-of-a-kind prints. Using additive and reductive methods, students work in black and white and in color. Processes including monotype, relief, and collograph are explored, with an emphasis on medium experimentation. This course is restricted to non-art majors.

 

Art History Courses for Non-Art Majors

The following art history courses meet General Studies requirements for non-art majors (but not for art majors).  Prerequisites apply.

 

ARTH 1500 - Art and Visual Literacy

Prerequisite: ENG 1009 or ENG 1010 or Permission of Department;

Restricted to those students who are not majoring in art, communication design, or art history, theory and criticism.

Crosslisting: HON 1500

General Studies: Level II Arts and Humanities

This course is a general introduction to the tools and methods used to analyze and interpret works of art in a variety of contexts. Students learn how to effectively communicate how visual forms work in conjunction with cultural beliefs both in the past and present. Analytical tools appropriate to the disciplines of art criticism and art history, including the use of research, are used by the student to support interpretations. A variety of artistic traditions, including materials and techniques from across the globe and throughout time, are introduced so that students are prepared to identify and interpret historical and contemporary examples of visual art and design. By developing an awareness of the relationship between visual forms and the messages they convey, students increase their ability to respond critically to their own increasingly complex, visual environment. This course is designed for the non-major and recommended for the General Studies requirement in Arts and Humanities. Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or HON.

 

ARTH 1600 - World Art I: Art Prior to 1400

Prerequisite: ENG 1009 or ENG 1010 or Permission of Department Crosslisting: HON 1600

General Studies: Arts and Humanities and/or Global Diversity

This course is an introduction to the discipline of art history and the tools used to analyze and interpret works of art within their cultural contexts. As the first part of a two-part survey, the course examines art, design and architecture from the prehistoric age through the 14th century throughout a variety of global cultures. Analytical tools appropriate to the disciplines of art history, theory and criticism, including the use of research, are used by the student to support interpretations. This course provides the introductory foundations in art history for students in art, art history, and communication design majors and is recommended for non-majors to meet the General Studies requirements in Arts and Humanities and/or Global Diversity. Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or HON

 

ARTH 1700 - World Art II: Art 1400-1900

Prerequisite: ENG 1009 or ENG 1010 or Permission of Department

Prerequisite/Corerequisite: ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

Crosslisting: HON 1700

General Studies: Arts and Humanities and/or Global Diversity

In this course students are introduced to the art, design and architecture created around the world from the 14th through the 19th centuries. Students learn to research, analyze, and interpret works from the Italian Renaissance to French Impressionism, from Macchu Picchu to the Forbidden City. Students also explore the impact of historical attitudes about gender, power, and identity on artists and their artworks, as well as the influence of global exchanges through networks of trade, religious conversion, and colonization. This course is required for students majoring or minoring in art, art history, communication design and is recommended for non-majors to meet the General Studies requirements in Arts and Humanities and/or Global Diversity.

 

ARTH 2380 - Women, Art, and Gendar Politics

Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or ARTH 1500 or ARTH 1600 or ARTH 1700

General Studies: Arts and Humanities

Cross Listed Course: GWS 2380

This course surveys visual art production by women over a broad span of time and geographies and examines the roles that gender and gender politics have taken throughout art history. Topics include the differing roles and status that women have obtained as artists in western culture, access to artistic training, representations of women and constructs of femininity in western art, and comparative models in selected non-western cultures. Work by women throughout various waves of feminisms will also be addressed, and a range of gender frameworks will be introduced in order to interpret visual art.

Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or GWS


The following art history courses meet the multicultural requirement for any student.

 

ARTH 3300 - Multiculturalism and American Art 

Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of oral and written communication requirements; ARTH 1500 or ARTH 1600 or ARTH 1700

University Requirement(s): Multicultural

Cross Listed Course(s): NAS 3301

This course studies the work produced by artists of African American, Asian American, Latino/a American, and Native American ancestry and their contribution to art in the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be introduced to the artistic legacies of Africa, Asia, and the Americas and how they intersected with European and New World contexts to provide a dynamic and rich multicultural creative discourse. American artists whose creative activity reflects their varied and complex cultural heritages will be the focus, and students will analyze how bias and discrimination in the art world and culture at large have impacted the artists’ reception. In addition, students will discover how artists have contributed to modern and contemporary social, cultural, and aesthetic debates.

Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or NAS.

 

ARTH 3360 - Contemporary Chicana/o Art  

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1009 or ENG 1010 and ENG 1020 or ENG 1021; or permission of department

University Requirement(s): Multicultural

Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 3025

This course is a survey of contemporary Chicana/o art. The historical, religious, social and political contexts of the artworks are studied. Students examine recurrent themes, icons, imagery, and forms within the historical timeline. This course may not be used as the sole art history elective for art studio majors.

Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or CHS.

 

Non-art majors are also welcome in any art history course for which they meet all prerequisites.

 

Courses available to Industrial Design (IND) students with alternate prerequisites and permission of the Department of Art:

  • Sculpture courses
  • Moldmaking for Ceramics
  • Jewelry and Metalsmithing courses
  • Select Communication Design courses

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