ACTC

Auraria Cooperative Telecommunications Committee

Consisting of:

 

Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), University of Colorado – Denver (UCD), Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD), and the Community College of Denver (CCD) for the Information Technology (IT) Services departments. 


UNIVERSAL CABLE PLANT

IT Services

 

Building Infrastructure Distribution Systems

Guidelines, Methods and Standards

FORWARD  

This document is intended to aid in the planning and implementation of information systems cable plants.  The document content comes from Auraria Higher Education Committee, Information Technology, cabling distributors, cabling vendors, latest industry standards and common practices.  Users of this document are encouraged to validate the content and send revisions, corrections and/or requests to ACTC for review.

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Departments and Members Involved in the Design Process

 

Auraria Cooperative Telecommunications Committee (ACTC)

The ACTC working group consists of the following membership:

Name:                     Department/Company/Title:                                                                               Contact info:

 

Jerry Bishop            Networking Specialist, University of Colorado – Denver                                jerry.bishop@ucdenver.edu

Pete Candelaria        Electrical Manager, Auraria Higher Education Center                                             candelariap@ahec.edu

Kent Courtnage       Media Center Specialist, Auraria Higher Education Center                                     courtnagek@ahec.edu

Steve Davis             Telecom Specialist, Auraria Higher Education Center                                             sdavis@ahec.edu

Amparo Garcia        Network Engineer, Metropolitan State College of Denver                                      garciaam@mscd.edu

Iwona Haga             Network Engineer, Metropolitan State College of Denver                                      ihaga@mscd.edu

Randy Hagan          Senior Network Engineer, University of Colorado – Denver                        randy.hagan@ucdenver.edu

Greg Reese              Networking Specialist, Auraria Higher Education Center                                       ReeseG@AHEC.edu

Philip Kyburz          Networking Specialist, Community College of Denver                                          phkyburz@ccd.edu

Doug McLean         Facilities Manager, Auraria Higher Education Center                                             mcleand@ahec.edu

David Schuette        Senior Network Engineer, Architect, Metropolitan State College of Denver           schuettd@mscd.edu

Brian Stevenson      Network Manager, University of Colorado – Denver                                 brian.stevenson@ucdenver.edu

 

Confidentiality Statement

 

Material contained in these standards documents are confidential to Auraria Cooperative Telecommunications Committee (ACTC) and is provided to contractors, vendors, consultants and staff for the sole purpose of designing and budgeting infrastructure for campus buildings and select other properties.  Do not copy or redistribute any information without consent from a committee member. These documents are intellectual property of Auraria Higher Education Committee, and Anixter, Inc. and may contain proprietary customer information and should not be copied or used without consent.  If there are any concerns regarding the content and nature of this information, please contact an ACTC member or Anixter, Inc. Denver , CO for updates.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS  - requires additional formatting when document is done.

 

Chapter 1 Introduction

                                                                                                                                                                                               

1.1       Purpose

1.2       Scope

1.3       Applicable Standards & Adherence

1.4       Service Considerations

                                       

1.5  Performance specification (or mnf. preference)

1.6  Contractor Certifications/Qualifications

Chapter 2 Planning

2.1 Overview

2.2 Definitions

2.3 Specific Design Specifications and Construction Requirements

 

Chapter 3 Horizontal Infrastructure

3.1 General

3.2 Cable Subsystems and Media Types

3.3 Distance limitations

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Chapter 4  Products      (Section needs more updating with BTO specs & sol photos etc)

4.1 General

4.2 100 Ω UTP

                      4.3 Termination Hardware

 

Chapter 5 Documentation                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                                                                       

Chapter 6 Environmental Considerations - Life Safety

 

Chapter 7 Fiber Optics Installation Practices & Methods

 

Chapter 8 Data Centers

 

Chapter 10  Specific use Tennant Office Buildings

 

Appendices:

A:  Producers of Codes & Standards & Contact information

B:  Testing Procedures

C:  Wireless – Wired For Mobility and Network Equipment

D:  LEEDs and Green Best Practices

E:  Submittals requirements for RFP’s

F:  Network, Audio Visual and Television Equipment     (Not written yet, need more input and requirements)                       

                                                                  

G:  Emergency and Inter/Intra Building Life Safety Infrastructure  WEBS

H;  Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations

 

1.  INTRODUCTION

A.  This section describes the codes, standards, specifications, recommendations, and practices required for construction at the Auraria Campus. The Auraria Campus is comprised of four institutions: Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), University of Colorado – Denver (CUD), Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD), and the Community College of Denver (CCD) for the Information Technology (IT) Services departments.  They form a group called Auraria Cooperative Telecommunications Committee (ACTC). Division 27 applies to all telecommunications projects at Auraria Campus.

 

B.  The project general contractor (GC) is responsible for building telecommunications pathways and spaces as per the requirements described in this document.  The project GC shall provide these specific items: spaces (telecommunications rooms, telecommunications entrance faculty, and equipment rooms), pathways (riser and horizontal distribution), grounding system, and fire suppression systems, as described below.  AHEC is responsible, through its contractor, for providing cabling, data networking, and voice equipment.

 

C.  Corrections, comments, questions, or omissions shall be submitted to AHEC via the project manager.

 

1.1.     Purpose

 

The purpose of this document is to provide cable plant design criteria, specifications, installation and maintenance guidelines for a structured voice and data wiring system or Information Transport System (ITS) to support network applications requiring speeds up to 1.2 gigabit in the horizontal infrastructure, and 10 Gigabit for campus backbone and data center areas with support for migration to 40/100 Gigabit speeds where possible without re-cabling. This document is intended for the use of new and retrofit construction for the Auraria Higher Education Committee (AHEC) and affiliated campus facilities.

 

The telecommunications requirements reflected in this document should be incorporated into the initial programming phase for all new construction projects.

 

This document should improve building design productivity by eliminating the need to design building wiring from ground for each building.  This will result in reduced labor costs with service delivery improvements.  

 

Adherence to this document will enable support of non-IT applications in a consistent and cost effective manner.

 

 

1.2.   Scope

 

This document defines the minimum requirements for information system wiring within AHEC.  It covers the physical, electrical, environmental and maintenance requirements for the various communication equipment rooms and areas required to support communications.

 

This document covers only the passive wiring system and facilities design.  The specific components included are:

 

  • Copper and fiber transmission media
  • Equipment rooms
  • Telecommunications rooms
  • Telecommunications outlet and work area
  • Connecting and terminating hardware; cables, cords, cross-connect wires
  • Racks, trays and other support hardware
  • Grounding and bonding

 

This document does not address active network components, such as, routers, switches and hubs, however suggests appropriate Surge Suppression and UPS systems be considered as part of the infrastructure planning and implementation for racks and cabinets.

 

Planning, design and installation of wiring into a new building and the complete or partial retrofit of an existing building are covered.  Wiring of legacy systems to total Category 6 and or 6a compliance is covered.

 

Note:  This is a living document.  The criteria contained in this document are subject to revision and updating as warranted.

 

 

1.3.   Standards Adherence Overview

 

The communications cable plant system is composed of several smaller subsystems.  Together, these subsystems provide the physical transmission facility for voice and data services within a building or a campus network.

 

All of these sections are essential to the cabling plan and are addressed in this document.  It should be noted that the governing standards behind this and contact information are listed in Appendix – add reference:

 

A.  Applicable Codes, Standards, and Specifications.

 

1.  The following table of codes, standards, specifications, recommendations, and methods and procedures (M&P) are applicable to the provisioning of telecommunications services for ACTC.  They are incorporated by reference.

 

      Number Title
NFPA 70 National Electric Code (NECÒ) (2008)
IEEE C2 National Electric Safety Code (NESC)
IEEE 802.3-1998 Information Technology-Local and Metropolitan Area Networks - Part 3: Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) Access Method and Physical Layer Specifications
IEEE 802.3 100BaseFX Two fiber Multimode 100Mbps transmission for local & metropolitan area networks
1000Base- T 4 pair 100 ohm Category 5e/6 balanced copper cabling @ 100meters
1000Base- SX Short wavelength transceivers @ 260 meters for 62.5micron fiber and 550 meters 50 micron fiber @ 1 Gbps using 850nm optics
1000Base-LX Long wavelength transceivers @ 440 meters for 62.5micron fiber and 550 meters 50 micron fiber, 3Km on Single-mode @ 1 Gbps using 1300 nm optics
ISO/IEC/11801 International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnical Commission(IEC) 11801 Generic Cabling for Customer Premises (2002-2008) 
IEEE 802.3an Physical Layer and Management Parameters for 10 Gb/s Operation, Type 10Gbase-T (2006) 
IEEE 802.3af Power Over Ethernet Standard - 2003
IEEE 802 3at (Pending) Power Over Ethernet Plus Standard – Latest Draft
ANSI/TIA/EIA American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA)/ Electronic Industries Association (EIA) –568-B -Commercial Building Telecommunications Wiring Standards (2000-2008) 
ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard (Parts 1, 2, and 3)
ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.2-ad10 Transmission Performance Specifications for 4-pair 100 ohm Augmented Category 6 Cabling
   
ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-C.0 (Pending) Generic Telecommunications Cabling For Customer Premises Standard
ANSI/TIA/EIA-569-B Commercial Building Standard for Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces
ANSI/TIA/EIA-606-A Administration Standard for the Telecommunications Infrastructure of Commercial Buildings
J-STD-607-A Commercial Building Grounding (Earthing) and Bonding Requirements for Telecommunications
ANSI/TIA/EIA-758 Customer-Owned Outside Plant Telecommunications Cabling Standard
ANSI/TIA/EIA-862 Building Automation Systems Cabling Standard for Commercial Buildings
ANSI/TIA-942 Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard for Data Centers
ANSI/NECA/BICSI-568-2006 Installing Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling
ANSI/TIA-1005 Telecommunications Standard For Industrial Premises
ISO/IEC 11801 Generic Cabling For Customer Premises
BICSI® A Telecommunications Association (Building Industry Consulting Services International)Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual (TDMM), 11th Ed.; Network Design Reference Manual, 5th Ed.; Customer-Owned Outside Plant Design Manual 3rd Ed.; Wireless Design Reference Manual, 2nd Ed; Electronic Safety and Security Design Reference Manual, 1st Ed.; AV Design Reference Manual, 1st Ed.
OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.268
LEED Leadership in Energy and Environment Design, Voluntary National Standard being embraced by end-users.  Point system for End-User Certification of Green construction  
USGBC   United States Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org

                                   

 

2.  Requests for variations from code shall be submitted to the ACTC Code Committee via the project manager and must have ACTC approval.  The ACTC Code Committee will either disapprove or approve the request.  Approved code variation requests shall be then forwarded to the ACTC for consideration.  In general, requests for code variations shall not be looked upon favorably.  Variations from standards may be authorized by ACTC on a case-by-case basis and must be requested in writing by the designer through the project manager.

 

3.  ACTC will provide design parameters for the distribution systems and for systems in individual buildings, and ACTC shall be consulted during project design through the assigned project manager.

 

1.4.   Service Considerations

 

The following is a list of common services and systems that should be considered when the wiring infrastructure is designed:

 

  • Voice Services
  • Data Communications
  • Control Systems (Facilities Management Systems)
  • Patient Monitoring Systems (Technology Management Systems)
  • Security Systems and Surveillance
  • Audio Video Services
  • Wireless

 

1.5         Performance Specification / Manufacturer preference

 

A.      The ACTC committee has specified BerkTec Ortronics as our tuned solution manufacturer preference. Berk-Tek LANmark-1000 Enhanced Category 6 Cable (Plenum/Non-Plenum/Limited Combustible) Category 6 with Ortronics TracJack or Series II style as appropriate to fit the modular jack and faceplate used  Series II design hardware is preferred. Substitutions shall only be allowed with prior submittal of all component specifications to the committee in advance of bid due dates. Unanimous agreement by committee members and complete verified interoperability with any existing cabling system already in place within the building or project area in question is required.

 

1.6     Contractor Qualifications and quality assurance  

 

A.      The Telecommunications contractor must be an approved Ortronics Certified Installer at a Plus tier (CIP, CIP-GOLD, CIP-PLATINUM, and multi-site/national contractors ) and/or Berk-Tek Certified OASIS Integrator.  A copy of certification documents must be submitted with the quote in order for such quote to be valid.  The Telecommunications contractor is responsible for workmanship and installation practices in accordance with the Ortronics CI/CIP Program and Berk-Tek OASIS Program.  Ortronics/Berk-Tek will extend a NetClear 25-year Static, Dynamic and Applications Warranty to the end user once the Telecommunications contractor fulfills all requirements under Ortronics CI/CIP and/or Berk-Tek OASIS Program.  At least 30 percent of the copper installation and termination crew must be certified by BICSI, Berk-Tek, or Ortronics with a Technicians Level of Training.  Also, at least 10 percent of the optical fiber installation and termination crew must be certified by Berk-Tek or Ortronics or other approved organizations in Optical Fiber installation and termination practices.

B.      The Electrical Contractor (EC) is responsible for furnishing and installing all 110VAC circuits where required.

C.      The EC is responsible for furnishing and installing all conduit junction boxes and standard back-boxes, as required for voice data and/or security system wiring.

D.      The Voice Data contractor is responsible for furnishing and installing all low voltage, control and communications wiring.

All materials shall conform strictly to the standards and specifications set forth in this document.  Unless otherwise specified, all products furnished shall be designed, built, and installed in accordance with the latest and best practice of the electrical industry, and shall conform to the standards of the NEMA, ANSI, TIA/EIA, ICEA, IEEE, and NEC, and this specification wherever they apply.

 

Contractor personnel shall be qualified to perform the work and be knowledgeable in the following standards, skills and activities as applicable:

1.       TIA/EIA 568B and addenda, 569B and addenda, 606A and addenda, and 607A Standards.

2.       Bonding and grounding where required.

3.       Testing conductors for electrical continuity.

4.       Testing conductors and fiber circuits for performance compliance.

5.       Manufacturer Certified cable terminations for specified connectors and terminations for copper and fiber cables.

Contractor personnel will be required to provide and use proper tools in the performance of each activity.  The tools must be in good working order.  The project owner reserves the right to review the tool lists and the tool maintenance procedures of the contractor.

 

Testing and Reports

When work under these specifications is complete, Contractor shall test continuity and performance of all wiring to verify, and provide point to point labeling. Provide written documentation of test results which indicate that all wiring is free of shorts, opens, or other failures and that any required grounds or shields are terminated properly.

Contractor shall repair or replace any cable and connectivity failing any test.

Quality Assurance

All equipment shall equal or exceed the minimum requirements of ANSI/TIA, Underwriters Labs, NEMA, and NEC.

All materials and equipment furnished shall be new and unused and free from defects.

Cabling components shall be the product of one manufacturer and category type within the cabling channel. The only exception will be in the event of an authorized system retrofit or upgrade to the next higher category of compliance, where a phased approach within the cable channel is implemented ie: replacement of patch cords, connectors or panels with a higher category product.

All materials shall bear labels attesting to Underwriters Laboratory approval, provided a standard is established for the material in question.

 

  2.  PLANNING

 

2.1. Overview

 

  The planning, design and implementation process of a building infrastructure system is a complex operation.  Pre-planning to design a flexible, reliable distribution infrastructure system will ensure enhanced communications capabilities.

 

This planning should begin during the programming phase of new building construction, or a major renovation project.  The following are basic guidelines to be used only as tools to better understand the considerations involved in planning and design. 

 

2.11  To facilitate provisioning of telecommunications services, the architect/engineer shall provide ACTC with floor plan drawings for new building construction and major renovation projects during design and at construction.  CAD drawings of the Electrical/Communications plans shall be provided to AHEC upon release of construction document through the project manager.

 

2.12  The project’s technology consultant shall meet with the building’s projected occupants, ACTC Standards Sub Committee, and other interested parties to determine the telecommunications requirements of the occupants. Compliance with overall campus telecommunications plans will also be validated during these meetings.  The technology consultant shall submit all findings to ACTC for review and approval.

 

2.13  The preliminary plans, indicating service locations and space requirements, will be returned to project managers for inclusion in the final plans.

 

2.14.  Wherever possible or required, solutions and suppliers adhering to LEEDs Certification programs and offering LEEDS points shall be utilized for construction, materials supply and handling. This will potentially enable financial benefits in many areas for each participating educational institution moving forward.

 

2.2.  Consult with ACTC for the following.

 

2.21.  Acceptability for specific substitutions of specified products.

 

2.22. Guidance in the application of a standard or specification in a non-listed or design situation.

 

2.23.  Approval for deviation from standards and specifications or industry-standard methods and procedures if indicated by special circumstances.

 

2.3.  Workmanship.  All materials and equipment shall be installed in accordance with recommendations of the manufacturer as approved by the architect, to conform to initial design requirements or specification’s and contract documents. 

 

2.4  Project Deliverables – applicable to all AHEC projects.

 

In addition to any delivery requirements identified in the subcontract the selected vendor on any project will execute with the General Contractor, ACTC Committee IT Operations requires the following deliverables:

 

2.41 Acceptance Testing:   Each phase of the project will require acceptance testing. All tests must be performed according to the test criteria listed in Appendix – add reference .  The acceptance test plans will be developed by the contractor and approved by ACTC Committee, GC and the manufacturer.   ACTC Committee IT Operations reserves the right to stop work on all or parts of the project until acceptance criteria is met.  Deliverables include: the acceptance test plan, summary of notes for each test and a final “sign off” from ACTC Committee IT, GC, and the manufacturer acknowledging acceptance of each phase of the project and the final integrated structured cable infrastructure.

 

2.42   As Built Drawings:    As built drawings will be provided for two purposes.  The contractor will work with GC to incorporate structured cable infrastructure into overall site drawings maintained by ACTC Committee facilities management.  In addition to the as built drawings for ACTC Committee facilities, the contractor will provide separate CAD drawings showing the cable details for each segment of the project down to the desktop connection.  The drawing will be provided in both hard copy prints and soft copy for future modification by ACTC Committee.  The as built drawings will include an integrated materials summary for ACTC Committee to conduct post installation asset management.

 

The drawings provided for the MC and TC’s should include both a floor plan layout as well as elevations for the racks and cable management systems.

 

2.43   Documentation:  Each product or service delivered to ACTC Committee will be accompanied with product specification details and operations guides.

 

In addition to product documentation, a complete labeling plan will be provided to ACTC Committee that shows where each connection is terminated and the function it performs.  The labeling plan should be integrated into the as built CAD drawings provided to ACTC Committee IT Operations.

 

 

 

2.5  DEFINITIONS

 

A.  Telecommunications.  Any transmission, emission, or reception of signs, signals, writings, images, and sounds, or information of any nature by wire, radio, visual, or other electromagnetic systems.  Includes, but is not limited to, voice communications networks, Local Area Networks (LAN), Wide Area Networks (WAN), and Local Exchange Carriers (LEC).

 

B.  Telecommunications Room (TR).  A floor serving facility for housing telecommunications equipment, cable terminations, cross-connections, and network electronics.  The TR is the recognized transition point between the building backbone and the horizontal pathway facilities.

 

C.  Equipment Room (ER).  A campus serving space.  An ER houses primary system electronics, power, cooling, and media distribution for a campus or groups of buildings.  The Communications Center in Arts Classroom Building is an example of a campus serving ER.  ERs require extensive planning due to their size, nature, scope, and complexity.  ERs are not typically required for most projects.

 

D.  Telecommunications Entrance Facility (TEF).  Serves as the entry point into a building for the campus backbone media.  TEFs interconnect the building backbone to campus backbone.  The TEF is where conductive copper media receives it primary protection from sustained hazardous voltages.  Therefore, significant wall space in the TEF may be required for primary protection of copper circuits.  Also called the Service Entrance (SE).

 

E.  Telecommunications Main Grounding Busbar (TMGB).  The building’s main telecommunications grounding point.  The TMGB is busbar placed in the TEF, ER, or a selected TR to provide interconnection to the building’s power ground via a bonding conductor for telecommunications.

 

F.  Telecommunications Grounding Busbar (TGB).  A common point of connection for telecommunications systems and equipment for bonding to ground.  TGBs are required in all TRs and ERs.

 

G.  Telecommunications Bonding Backbone (TBB).  A conductor that electrically interconnects the TMGB to all TGBs.

 

H.  Grounding Equalizer (GE).  A conductor used to interconnect two or more vertical TBBs in multistory buildings.  Previously called a Telecommunications Bonding Backbone Interconnecting Bonding Conductor (TBBIBC). 

 

I.  Network.  Backbone media and electronics for transport of electronic information between campus entities.

 

J.  Horizontal Distribution.  The facility used for installation of media from the TR to the work area.  Usually consists of cable tray and J-hooks to the work area faceplate.

 

K.  Work Area (WA).  A building space where the occupant generally interacts with the telecommunications equipment.  WAs are typically defined as 100 ft2 of usable space.

 

L.  Building backbone.  The pathways between floors for distribution of media.  Building backbone was previously called riser cabling.

 

M.  Campus backbone.  The pathways and media that provide connectivity between the Communication Center in the Arts Classroom Building and all other buildings on the Auraria Campus (AHEC).  The campus backbone provides connectivity between buildings.  The campus backbone represents the outside plant (OSP) infrastructure.

 

N.  AHEC Telecom Services.  Department responsible for telecommunications on the Auraria campus.

O. Technology Consultant.  A firm or member of a firm that has considerable technology design experience and possesses working knowledge and subject matter expertise in telecommunications code (NEC and NESC), industry standards (see TIA/EIA commercial standards in references), and BICSI methods and procedures (Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, LAN Design Manual, and Customer-Owned Outside Plant Design Manual). 

 

1.  State of Colorado, Purchasing maintains a list of pre-screened technology consultants that can be obtained from the project manager. 

 

2.  Technology consultants used for ACTC projects shall be selected from the pre-screened technology consultant list.

 

3.  Technology consultants not listed on the pre-screened technology consultant list must meet with State of Colorado, Purchasing for certification and possible inclusion on the list.  Firms vying for campus technology consultant designation must possess a registered communication distribution designer (RCDD) on staff.  The RCDD must be thoroughly familiar with campus standards and methods and procedures and be dedicated to the assigned project. 

 

2.6  SPECIFIC DESIGN SPECIFICATION AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

 

A.  Telecommunications Entrance Facility (TEF) or Service Entrance (SE).

 

1.  All buildings require a TEF.  The TEF serves as the entry point into a building for the campus backbone media.  TEFs interconnect the building backbone to the campus backbone.  The TEF shall be solely dedicated to telecommunications services.  Space shall not be shared with electrical installations other than those designed and intended for telecommunications.  The TEF shall be vertically aligned or stacked with the TRs to facilitate interconnection with the floors above and below.  ACTC must be consulted if the TEF does not align with the building’s TRs.

 

2.  TEFs may be co-located inside TRs or ERs, depending on the size of the building they support.  Buildings larger than 100,000 ft2 may require a dedicated TEF.  Buildings with 5 or more stories shall have a shared TR/TEF that is a minimum size of 10’ x 16’.  These larger TEFs shall support 5 equipment racks, with one rack being dedicated to fiber optics cable management.  TEF ceiling height shall be a minimum of 8’ 6”. 

                                      

 

3.  The TEF shall be dry and free from the danger of flooding.  The TEF shall not be located where water ingress is possible or probable.  No water or drain piping shall be routed through the TEF that is not associated with TEF equipment.  Steam, heat, and any other source of environmental hazard shall be avoided.  

 

4.  TEF location should be carefully considered.  Accessibility for the delivery of equipment as well as expansion should be provided for.  TR location must also be designed for maximum cable lengths as specified in associated documents listed in References. 

 

5.  The TEF location should not be adjacent to any source of electromagnetic interference (EMI).  The TEF shall be located away from sources of EMI at a distance which will reduce the interference to 3.0 V/m throughout the deployed frequency range.  Interference may not exceed 3.0 V/m throughout the usable bandwidth of the communications cabling.  Bandwidth for telecommunications is up to 500 MHz.

 

6.  Typical equipment requirements have a temperature range from 64°F to 75°F (18°C to 24°C) with a desired non-condensing, relative humidity range from 30% to 55%.  Humidifiers are not typically required in TEFs.  Fan coil units are the required cooling solution in TEFs.  Typically 20,000 BTUs of cooling are required in the TEF.  Consult ACTC for specific TEF cooling requirements.  Temperature sensors shall be configured for alarm reporting and HVAC support units shall be installed on emergency power.

 

7.  The TEF is where conductive copper media receives it primary protection from sustained hazardous currents.  Therefore, significant wall space in the TEF may be required for primary protection of copper circuits.  All four TEF walls shall be covered by rigidly fixed, 3/4" trade size, non-combustible A/C grade plywood, void free, mounted 6” above the finished floor (AFF) to 8’6” AFF.  (To see a sample of A/C fire rated plywood, contact Strait Lumber 11150 E. Colfax Avenue, Aurora CO 303.366.3561; description: 4x8-23/32” AC Fire Retard Ply PLY34ACNC).  The A-side (smooth side) of the sheet shall be outward facing.

The A/C plywood shall be securely fastened to the wall and shall be painted with two coats of fire retardant white paint.  

8.  TEF design must conform to vibration requirements specified in TIA/EIA-569.

 

9.  The TEF lighting shall be a minimum of 500-lux (50 foot-candles) measured 1 meter from the finished floor and shall be mounted to meet the design configurations of the room.  Emergency lighting is recommended.  Lighting shall be placed to light the front and rear of the racks.

 

10.  The TEF door shall be a minimum of 36” wide and 80” high, without doorsill, hinged to open outward, and fitted with a lock compliant with ACTC and Facilities assigned key codes.   The TEF door shall also have an electronic lock.

 

11.  Floors, walls, and ceiling shall be treated and sealed to eliminate dust.  Finish shall be light in color to enhance room lighting.  Antistatic flooring materials shall be used.

 

12.  All TEF ceilings shall be open to structure; to provide space over the equipment frames for suspended cable trays or ladder racks.  Suspended cable trays and ladder racks are typically installed at 7’ AFF.  TEFs shall be free of false or suspended ceilings.  Ceiling protrusions (i.e. fire suppression sprinkler heads) must be placed to assure a minimum of 8 feet of clearance from the finished floor.

 

13. A dedicated electrical panel shall be placed in each TEF to support telecommunications equipment.  The panel shall be rated at 100 Amps or higher to facilitate future growth.  The panel may not be shared, it is for the exclusive use of the TEF’s equipment.  Emergency generator power is required for the TEF, if available in the project.  Label the panel per campus standard.

 

14.  A minimum of eight (8) dedicated, IG, unswitched 20A, 120-VAC duplex outlets, each on a separate circuit, shall be provided for equipment power at heights and locations specified by ACTC during the design phase.  These eight dedicated circuits shall be installed from above into the equipment racks as directed by ACTC.  Additional convenience duplex outlets, on a separate dedicated unswitched circuit, should be provided at 6’ intervals around the room. Install the convenience receptacles 15” AFF or as directed by ACTC.  Label all outlets to the campus standard.  Emergency generator power is required for the TEF, if available in the project.

 

15.  Sleeves or slots through walls and floors shall be fitted with approved re-enterable firestopping.  Applicable codes, standards, and specifications shall be enforced.

 

16.  Building backbone pathways connecting the TEF to TRs will require a minimum of four Trade Size 4” sleeves/conduits for interconnection, except where cable tray exists.  A minimum of two (2) spare conduits must be installed when the TEF is not vertically aligned from floor-to-floor to allow for lower fill ratios.

 

17.  Sprinkler heads shall be provided with wire cages to prevent accidental discharge.  Preaction sprinklers are preferred over wet pipe or dry pipe systems.  If wet pipe or dry pipe systems are employed, then drainage troughs shall be provided under the sprinkler heads and pipes to prevent leakage onto the TEF equipment.  High temperature heads are preferred. 

 

B.  Telecommunications Room (TR).

 

1.  A minimum of one TR shall be designated per floor and that TR shall be solely dedicated to telecommunications services.  Space shall not be shared with electrical installations other than those designed and intended for telecommunications.  TRs shall be vertically stacked to facilitate interconnection with the floors above and below. 

 

2.  The TR shall be dry and free from the danger of flooding.  The TR shall not be located where water ingress is possible or probable.  No water or drain piping shall be routed through the TR that is not associated with TR equipment. Steam, heat, and any other source of environmental hazard shall be avoided. 

 

3.  The minimum TR size is 10’ x 12’.  Ceiling open structure.  Variations in size shall be approved by ACTC on a case-by-case basis and will be dependent upon the floor size and applications to be served.

 

4.  TRs shall be designed to meet floor loading (minimum floor loading of 50 lbf/ft2) as specified in the references section. 

 

5.  TR location should not be adjacent to any source of EMI.  The TR shall be located away from sources of EMI at a distance which will reduce the interference to 3.0 V/m throughout the deployed frequency range.  Interference may not exceed 3.0 V/m throughout the usable bandwidth of the communications cabling.  Telecommunications bandwidth is up to 500 MHz.

 

6.  TRs require a temperature range from 64°F to 75°F (18°C to 24°C).  The desired non-condensing, relative humidity range is from 30% to 55%.  Humidifiers are not typically required in TRs.  Temperature sensors shall be configured for alarm reporting and HVAC support units shall be installed on emergency power.  A minimum of one air change per hour is required.  Typically, 20,000 BTUs of cooling are required in the TR.  Fan coil units are the required cooling source.

 

7.  All four TR walls shall be covered by. rigidly fixed, 3/4" trade size, non-combustible A/C grade plywood, void free, mounted 6” above the finished floor (AFF) to 8’6” (To see a sample of A/C fire rated plywood, contact Strait Lumber 11150 E. Colfax Avenue, Aurora CO 303.366.3561; description: 4x8-23/32” AC Fire Retard Ply PLY34ACNC).  The A-side (smooth side) of the sheet shall be outward facing.  The plywood shall be securely fastened to the wall and painted with white fire retardant paint. 

 

8.  TR design must conform to vibration requirements specified in TIA/EIA-569.

 

9.  The lighting shall be a minimum of 500-lux (50 foot-candles) measured 1 meter from the finished floor and shall be mounted to meet the design configurations of the room.  Emergency lighting is desired.  Lighting shall be placed to light the front and rear of the racks.

 

10.  The TR door shall be a minimum of 36” wide and 80” high, without doorsill, hinged to open outward, and fitted with a lock compliant with ACTC and Facilities assigned key codes.  The TR door shall also have an electronic lock.

 

11.  Floors, walls, and ceiling shall be treated and sealed to eliminate dust.  Finish shall be light in color to enhance room lighting.  Antistatic flooring materials shall be used.

 

12.  All TR ceilings shall be a minimum of 8' 6" high, unobstructed; to provide space over the equipment frames for suspended cable trays or ladder racks.  Suspended cable trays and ladder racks are typically installed at 7’ AFF in TRs. TRs shall be free of false or suspended ceilings.  Ceiling protrusions (i.e. fire suppression sprinkler heads) must be placed to assure a minimum of 8 feet of clearance from the finished floor.

 

13. A dedicated electrical panel shall be placed in each TR to support telecommunications equipment.  The panel shall be rated at 100 Amps or higher to facilitate future growth.  The panel may not be shared, it is for the exclusive use of the TR’s equipment.  Emergency generator power is required for all TRs, if available in the project.  Label the panel per campus standard.

 

14.  A minimum of eight (8) dedicated, IG, unswitched 20A, 120-VAC duplex outlets, each on a separate circuit, shall be provided for equipment power at heights and locations specified by ACTC during the design phase.  These eight dedicated circuits shall be installed from above into the equipment racks as directed by ACTC.  Additional convenience duplex outlets, on a separate dedicated unswitched circuit, should be provided at 6’ intervals around the room.  Additional convenience duplex outlets, on a separate dedicated unswitched circuit, should be provided at 6’ intervals around the room.  Install the convenience receptacles 15” AFF or as directed by IT Services.  Label all outlets to the campus standard.  Emergency generator power is required for each TR, if available in the project.

 

15.  Sleeves or slots through walls and floors shall be fitted with approved re-enterable firestopping.  Applicable codes, standards, and specifications shall be enforced. 

 

16.  Building backbone pathways connecting TR’s will require a minimum of four (4) Trade Size 4” sleeves/conduits for interconnection, except where cable tray exists.  A minimum of two (2) spare conduits must be installed when TR’s are not vertically aligned from floor-to-floor to allow for lower fill ratios.

 

17.  Sprinkler heads shall be provided with wire cages to prevent accidental operation.  Preaction sprinklers are preferred over wet pipe or dry pipe systems.  If wet pipe or dry pipe systems are employed, then drainage troughs shall be provided under the sprinkler heads and pipes to prevent leakage onto the TR equipment.  High temperature heads are preferred.

 

C.  Pathways.

 

1.  Cable Tray.

 

a. Ventilated, solid-sided continuous aluminum cable tray shall be used to provide horizontal pathways for station wiring.  Where cable tray is not possible (in renovation projects only), alternative pathways shall be provided, as approved by IT Services.  In these cases, cables must be supported every 48” to 60”. Wire Basket type tray may also be  acceptable – approve with project manager.

 

b.  ACTC requires 18“ or 24” cable tray (6” deep, with 9” rung spacing) in main corridors, with secondary runs supported by 12” or 18” cable tray (4” or 6” deep, with 9” rung spacing) as specified by AHEC.  The actual cable tray size depends upon the floor’s requirements.  The cable tray shall be continuous from end-to-end.

 

c.  Cable tray shall be supported and loaded in compliance with applicable electrical codes and recommended fill ratios per type or category of cable included in tray.

 

d.  A minimum of 12” access headroom shall be provided and maintained above the cable tray.  Access to cable tray should not be restricted.  

 

e.  A minimum of 3” of clear, vertical space shall be available above ceiling tiles.

 

f.  Cable tray shall not be installed higher than 11 feet AFF.

 

g.  Cable tray shall use factory T’s, sweeps, and interconnections.  The cable tray shall be continuous, without gaps, opening, or breaches.

 

h.  Cable tray shall be unbroken and suitably firestopped with re-enterable firestopping when passing through a firewall.  Trade Size 4” sleeves shall be required for connection of cable tray through walls.  Approved mechanical firestopping may be substituted for approved nonmechanical firestopping.  ACTC approves all firestopping substitutions.

 

i.  Cable tray shall be grounded and bonded to the TBB with a 6 AWG uninsulated conductor.  Bond every longitudinal cable tray component.

 

j.  Cable tray may be shared with all low voltage systems, as coordinated with AHEC.

                           

2.  J-hooks and conduit.

 

a.  A 2” minimum reamed and bushed conduit shall be provided from the cable tray to each room.  This entrance sleeve shall be shared by all low voltage systems entering the room.  A larger sleeve, as specified by IT Services, may be required depending upon the room’s size and low voltage requirements.  

 

b.  A 1” conduit shall be used to provide a pathway inside the wall to each work area outlet.  The conduit shall be stubbed out to the top of the wall and be physically oriented towards the floor’s cable tray.  The conduit end shall be reamed and bushed. 

 

c.  From the stubbed work area conduit, J-hooks shall be provided and installed by the cable installer to provide a pathway to the cable tray. 

 

1).  J-hook sizes available from ¾” up to 4”.   Preferred hook is Panduit J-Pro supports. These are non metallic, have a 1” bend radius, are rounded and will not damage cable as it’s pulled through.  Also ul approved and suitable for air handling spaces.  Assembly attachments for any environment.  Full line cross available to Caddy. Available in red to differentiate security cable runs or other specialty cabling if needed.  Velcro straps slide through the hook and secure cable bundles.

 

2).  J-hooks are required every 48” to 60” along the pathway. 

 

3).  Individual J-hooks may support no more than 50 cables. 

 

4).  J-hooks shall not be shared with other low voltage systems.  That is, all other low voltage systems require their own J-hook pathway.  J-hook support rods may be shared at pathway crossings or where approved by AHEC before hand. 

 

a).  When J-hook support rods are shared at crossings or at AHEC approved locations, a minimum clearance of 12” is needed between low voltage J-hooks and telecommunications J-hooks. 

 

b).  Telecommunications J-hooks shall be placed at the bottom of any shared support rod to facilitate frequent moves, adds, and changes.

 

5).  Telecommunications J-hook wire supports shall be distinguished by their Black color. These are fire retardant and meet plenum specifications. Red available for Fire alarm and security cabling.

 

6).  J-hook wire supports shall be secured at both ends as per NEC 300.11.

 

a)       If due to obstructions, limited access ceilings, or in clinical areas, conduit/tray may be used in lieu of J-hooks.  All conduit/tray runs shall be coordinated with and approved by AHEC.

 

1).  No section of conduit shall be more than 100’ in length or contain more than two 90° bends between pull boxes or pull points. 

 

2).  Boxes shall not be used in lieu of bends.  Electrical 90° elbows (type LB) are not permitted.  Corresponding conduit ends must be aligned within boxes. 

 

3).  All conduit ends shall be reamed and bushed. 

 

4).  Conduit shall comply with NEC and local codes, standards, and specifications.  AHEC may stipulate additional specifications as required.

 

5).  The bend radius for < 2” conduits should be 6 times the internal diameter of the conduit.  Conduits over 2” OD shall have a bend radius at least 10 times the internal diameter of the conduit.  Wide sweeps shall be used for all conduits over 2”.

 

6).  Polyline pull strings with a strength rating of 200 pounds shall be provided for all conduit runs.

 

3.  Work area outlets.  A work area telecommunications outlet shall be a four-plex, deep box with a single-gang mud ring unless otherwise specified during design.

 

4.  Building backbone.  Building backbone (riser) conduits shall be Trade Size 4” conduit, minimum.  Measured pulling tape shall be provided in all horizontal or vertical building backbone conduits.

 

D.  Telecommunications Grounding and Bonding.

 

1.  The TEF, TRs, and ERs require grounding and bonding.  ACTC does NOT require separate an isolated grounding system for its voice and data networks.  See Diagram below for reference.

 

2.  Each building shall have one Telecommunications Main Grounding Busbar (TMGB), which is bonded to the building’s electrical service entrance and is electrically contiguous to the Grounding Electrode Conductor (GEC).  The TGMB is usually located in a TEF, ER, or in an ACTC specified TR.  The TMGB shall be bonded to building structural steel, the entrance facility, and electrical service grounds with a minimum 6 AWG stranded copper. 

 

3.  Each TR shall have at least one Telecommunications Grounding Busbar (TGB), which is connected back to the TMGB via the Telecommunications Bonding Backbone (TBB). 

 

4.  The TMBG and TBG shall be made of copper and have the following minimum dimensions: 24” long, 4” wide, and ¼” thick.  The TMGB and TGB shall be drilled and tapped to accept standard NEMA compliant grounding hardware. Equipment grounds shall use a minimum 6 AWG stranded, insulated copper to the TMGB and TGB and be attached with standard NEMA compliant grounding hardware.  Telecommunications connections shall be at 3 Ohms or less.

 

5.  The minimum TBB conductor size is 6 AWG, but consideration shall be given to using 3/0 AWG conductor, as per the J-STD-607-A TBB sizing table shown below.

 

TBB Linear Length (Feet) TBB Size (AWG)
Less than 4 6
4 to 6 4
6 to 8 3
8 to 10 2
10 to 13 1
13 to 16 1/0
16 to 20 2/0
Greater than 20 3/0

 

5.  The TBB shall be installed in its own pathway, independent of the IP Services pathways. 

 

6.  A TBB may be an insulated conductor.  Each telecommunications bonding conductor (from equipment) shall be a 6 AWG insulated conductor, with distinctively green colored insulation.  The TBB used to bond cable tray shall be uninsulated, 6 AWG minimum.  TBBs shall be placed so they avoid bends, curves, and diverts.  Straight and linear TBB runs are required.

 

7.  Whenever two or more vertical TBBs are used in a multistory building, the TBBs shall be bonded together with a Grounding Equalizer (GE) at the building’s top floor and at a minimum of every third floor in between. 

 

8.  The TBB, GE, TMGB, and TGB shall be marked with nonmetallic labels, as specified by IT Services. 

 

E.  Equipment Room (ER).

 

1.  ERs are not required for most buildings; contact ACTC for need and placement. 

 

2.  Generally, each campus requires a minimum of one ER.  Buildings may require an ER if they are located at some significant distance from the (needs to be added above) nearest Communications Center in Arts, North, South, Central or Admin Classroom Building.  The ACTC will specify when an ER is required.  ERs shall be exclusively dedicated to telecommunications services.  ER space must not be shared with electrical services other than those designed and intended for telecommunications.  The ER should be centrally located to minimize the size and length of backbone cabling as well as provide easements and pathways for backbone and carrier services required of the room.  The room shall not be adjacent to any high -voltage electrical services or water mains.  A location should also be selected to allow for movement of large or heavy equipment.  Access to cable pathways are required.  ER walls should extend to structure and provide a sealed environment for equipment. 

 

3.  Consult TIA-942, Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard for Data Centers for ER design and implementation guidance.  ACTC desires that ERs be built within a Tier 2 (redundant components) to Tier 3 (concurrently maintainable) framework.

 

4.  The ER may also serve as the TEF facility for local exchange carriers (LEC) or competitive local exchange carrier (CLEC) where such a separate facility does not exist.  Adjacency to existing carrier entrance facilities is required.

 

5.  Sizing of ER will be calculated using area of service, types of service provided, and projections of growth.  ACTC design engineers will provide space requirements based on these factors.  The minimum size of an ER is 300 ft2. Working clearances of 3 feet must be provided for all scheduled and installed equipment.

 

6.  ERs may require access (raised) flooring to allow for the cable routing from cable vaults to equipment frames and PBX equipment.  Cable tray, or equivalent, must be provided for cable management under the raised floor, if provided. Finished floor height must be at least 12” from the sub-floor to accommodate the cable management systems.  The plenum area may be used for air handling for equipment cooling.  All metal parts of the raised floor must be bonded to ground.  Floor panels must be covered with high-pressure laminate or a durable, vinyl tile resistant to static electricity.

 

7.  Floor loading capacity shall be sufficient to bear both the distributed and concentrated load of the installed equipment.  The ER distributed loading shall be at least 100 lbf/ft2 and the concentrated loading must be at least 2000 lbf. Distributed floor loading may range as high as 350 lbf/ft2.

 

8.  ER design must conform to vibration requirements specified in TIA/EIA-569.

 

9.  The ER shall be dry and free from the danger of flooding.  The ER must not be located where water ingress is possible or probable.  No water or drain piping shall be routed through the ER that is not associated with ER equipment. Steam, heat, and any other source of environmental hazard shall be avoided.

 

10.  Water leak detection and alarming required.

 

11.  The floors, walls, and ceilings shall be treated and sealed to eliminate dust. 

 

12.  All four walls in the ER shall be covered by rigidly fixed, 3/4" trade size, non-combustible A/C grade plywood, void free, mounted 6” above the finished floor (AFF) to 8’6”    The A-side (smooth side) of the sheet shall be outward facing.  The A/C plywood shall be securely fastened to the wall and shall be painted with two coats of fire retardant white paint.  

 

13.  ER location should not be adjacent to any source of EMI.  Interference may not exceed 3.0 V/m throughout the usable bandwidth of the communications cabling.  Sources of EMI should be kept 3 meters from the ER. 

 

14.  ER doors shall be a minimum of 36” wide by 80” high.  Due to the nature of the equipment located in the ER, ERs require at least one oversized door (72” by 90”) to allow large equipment to be moved in or out.  Doors should open outward.  ER doors shall be secured with electronic access and a lockset specified by AHEC Facilities.

 

15.  ER ceilings shall be a minimum of 8' 6" high, unobstructed; to provide space over the equipment frames for suspended cable trays or racks.  ERs shall be free of false or suspended ceilings.  Ceiling protrusions (i.e. fire suppression) must be placed to assure a minimum of 8 feet of clearance from the finished floor.

 

16.  ERs require lighting with a uniform intensity of 500 lux (50 foot candles) when measured 1 meter above the finished floor.  Indirect lighting is not desired.  Connect lighting fixtures for ERs to separate electrical circuits from those that accommodate the equipment in the room.  To avoid blocking or filtering the light, do not place lighting equipment above equipment cabinets, termination frames, or other freestanding equipment.  Lighting shall be placed to light the front and rear of the racks.  Use a light colored finish to enhance room lighting.  Provide emergency lighting in ERs. 

 

17.  Specific circuits for equipment in ERs will be designated during the space planning process and shall be placed according to ACTC approved blueprints.  In addition to those circuits, additional electrical outlets are required in all ERs.  All such electrical outlets shall be grounded, non-switched, and separately fused.  ERs require one 120-VAC, 20-amp duplex receptacle per every 12 linear feet of wall space.  Emergency generator power is required for ERs.  UPS are also recommended, sized to handle a 10-minute outage.

 

18.  Temperature and moisture shall be controlled in all ERs.  Typical equipment room requirements are:

 

a.  Temperature range from 64° F to 75° F (18° C to 24° C);

 

b.  Relative humidity range from 30% to 55%; humidifiers are required in ERs;

 

c.  Heat dissipation of up to 30,000 BTUs per hour per cabinet.  Consider room cooling, row cooling, or rack cooling topologies to achieve this heat removal.  Cold and hot aisles are desired.  Temperature sensors shall be configured for alarm reporting and HVAC CRAC units shall be installed on emergency power.  Consult ACTC for ER cooling requirements.

 

19.  When copper cable services for any ER exceeds 1800 pairs, provide a separate room (cable vault) for cable splices.  This room should be sized according to the requirements of the facility and should be located adjacent to the ER with free pathways to terminating equipment and cross-connect fields. 

 

20.  The ER should support a three-phased fire detection and suppression system. 

 

a.      An air sampling fire detection system is required.  Intelligent very early smoke detection (VESD) is desired.  Contact AHEC for desired vendors of solutions already in use.

 

b.      An HFC-227ea (FE-227 or FM-200, FM-200 preferred) inert gas fire suppression agent is recommended. 

 

c.       A preaction water-based fire suppression sprinkler is requirement.  Such sprinkler systems should have cabinet troughs to prevent accidental water damage to the equipment.  The sprinklers should be caged or recessed and have high temperature valve fuse release heads.  Equipment power off should be initiated prior to water release to minimize water damage to equipment.

 

21.  Class C (or ABC) hand-held fire extinguishers shall be placed inside the ER.  Pull stations shall be placed at all doors.  EPO buttons are required at each door.  Label all stations to campus standards.  EPO buttons and pull stations shall have safe guard features to preclude accidental release.

 

22.  Fire stop penetrations (area around sleeves, drilled core floor openings, and cables) shall be sealed or plugged with an 8-to-1 ratio expandable urethane foam with a 1" thick topping of water plug cement or equivalent.  All unused sleeves must be plugged and capped with approved firestop.

 

3       Horizontal Infrastructure

 

3.1                                      General

 

Each subsystem provides a specific function in the typical AHEC cable plant system.  The facility subsystem provides the interconnection between buildings.  Each subsystem consists of:

 

  • Entrance facilities
  • Equipment rooms
  • Transmission media (wire and cable)
  • Cross-connects
  • Terminations
  • Racks    
  • Pathways

 

 

3.1.1 Twisted Pair Cable

 

The horizontal UTP cable shall meet or exceed specifications associated with Category 6 cable as outlined in the ANSI/TIA/EIA568B.2-1 Category 6 specification.  The characteristics of category 6 cable are specified up to 250 MHz.  It is intended to be used for voice and data transmission rates up to and including 1.2 gigabit. With additional adherence to TSB155, mitigation techniques can result in some ability to support up to 10 gigabit operation for less than 55 meters, dependent upon the quality, performance and installation practices.

 

3.1.2 Attenuation

 

The maximum attenuation shall be adjusted at elevated temperatures using a factor of 0.3% increase per degree Celsius for Category 6 cables.  The cable attenuation shall be verified at a temperature for 40C and 60C and shall meet the requirements above after adjusting for temperature.

 

3.1.3 Near End Cross-Talk (NEXT)

 

Near end crosstalk (NEXT) is a measure of noise coupling from the transmit pair into a receive pair.  NEXT performance significantly improves as you progress from Category 3 to 5, 5E and 6.  Category 6 NEXT is about 10 dB (3 times) better than Category 5.  NEXT is a serious impairment, as crosstalk coupling interferes directly with the received signal.  NEXT is the reason why installers must maintain proper twist ratios when terminating connections.  NEXT is measured for all six pair-to-pair combinations at both ends of the link.                                                                                                                       

 

3.1.4  Installation Requirements

 

During the installation of twisted pair cabling, there are several critical considerations that must be addressed by the cable installers to ensure that maximum information through-put can be attained.  The major installation requirements are:

 

Based on the EIA/TIA-568-B.1 Standard, the maximum distance between the MDF and any IDF (riser cable subsystem) should not exceed 90 meters (295 feet) for 150 ohm shielded twisted pair cable, and 800 meters (2,624 feet) for 100 ohm unshielded twisted cable pair.

 

Based on the EIA/TIA-568-B.1 Standard, the maximum distance for horizontal station cabling should be 90 meters (295 feet) from the IDF in which it terminates.

 

Cable installed in cable trays shall not be wire tied but must be neatly laid in.  If not installed in conduit, all cables shall be secured to a permanent wire hanger every 4 to 5 feet (staggered).  Under no circumstances should cable be tied to water sprinkler lines.  Cabling practices as published in TIA/EIA-568-B.1 and in BICSI TDMM shall be strictly enforced.

 

All horizontal station cabling should be routed at least 5” inches from any fluorescent light fixtures and at least 48 inches from any electric motors or other RF source.

 

All horizontal station cabling will be one (1) (voice only), two (2) or four (4) four-pair cables (work area outlet), depending on information outlet type, pulled simultaneously from the IDF to each information outlet.

 

All cable bundles shall be secured with “Velcro” (listed for the environment). Cable tie-wraps are no longer allowed. All terminations at the connector level shall be made with an IDC impact termination tool.

 

3.2  Cable Subsystem and Media Types

 

3.2.1  Entrance Facility “EF”

 

The Entrance Facility is generally located in the MDF at most facilities, when it is not located in the MDF it shall be referred to as the “EF”

 

The entrance facility consists of the telecommunications service entrance to the building, including the entrance point through the building wall, and continuing to the entrance facility.  The entrance facility may contain the backbone pathways that link to other buildings in campus situations.  CATV and antenna entrances may also constitute part of the entrance facility.

 

A service entrance pathway shall be provided for each physical building.  The basic methods for provisioning are underground, buried and aerial pathways.  In determining the total number of pathways required, the planner shall consider the following:

 

  • Type and use of building
  • Growth
  • Difficulty of adding pathways in the future
  • Alternate entrance
  • Type and size of cables likely to be installed
  • Requested Services
  • Multiple Service Providers

 

Diverse routing and pathway redundancy is required for a 24 hour stay facility, less than a 24 hour stay facility should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis with each construction project.

 

3.2.2  Main Distribution Frame “MDF”

 

The Main Distribution Frame (MDF) provides distributed communications through backbone cabling to all of the Building Distribution Frames (BDFs) and Intermediate Distribution Frames (IDFs) for the facility.  The MDF is the main interface with Telephone switches (PBX), LAN core equipment, other individual network switches, etc.

 

3.2.3  Telecommunications Room/Datacommunications Room/IDF

 

The Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) provides the transition from the backbone subsystem to the horizontal subsystem.  This room is used to distribute communication services to all work area outlets.  It will usually contain the termination hardware where circuits can be rearranged and rerouted.  It usually includes passive cross-connect components and space for active network electronic components such as, routers, switches and hubs.

 

The IDF(s) shall contain the mechanical terminations for a portion of the horizontal cable subsystem and a portion for the backbone subsystem.  In this usage, the IDF shall provide facilities (i.e. space, power, grounding, etc.) for the passive or active devices or both used to interconnect the two subsystems.  There is no upper limit on the number of IDF(s), which may be provided within a building. 

 

All Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cable terminations in the distribution frames are completed on approved connecting blocks (Refer to Appendix A).  Designation strips for cable pair identification shall be provided on all termination blocks. Use of system wire management accessories is required for a description of connector system components to be used (Refer to Appendix A). Horizontal cables shall be terminated in sequential order. Each horizontal cable will have its own individual number.

 

At the distribution frames, cross-connect wiring shall be standardized for each type of cross-connect that will be implemented. The category rating of cross-connect cabling should meet or exceed the specifications of the application being cross- connected.

 

IDF/TR locations will be provided in a manner that will support a station cable design where the maximum length of station cable runs shall be less than 295 feet (on average, station cable runs should be between 150 and 225 feet).

 

There shall be a minimum of one IDF/TR per floor. In a multi-floor building, the IDF’s/TR’s should be stacked vertically so backbone cabling distances may be kept as short as possible, and for ease in adding additional cabling. An IDF/TR services only that floor.

 

The IDF(s)/TR(s)  shall have enough space to house active network electronics.  Space for servers shall be provided in an alternate room, adjacent rooms are preferred.   If an alternate room can not be provided all servers will then have to be located in the MDF in a co-locate area. The goal is to provide a secure, environmentally controlled area for servers while not jeopardizing the security and liability in the IDF(s)/TR(s).  

 

For new construction and major remodeling, there should be one centrally located 10’ x 15’ IDF/TR for every 10,000 square feet of usable floor space with a minimum of 200 pair UTP riser, additional riser may be needed for densely populated areas. All passive and active electronic components shall be mounted in a standard 19” floor-mount rack. All four walls shall be covered with rigidly fixed ¾” trade size AC grade plywood, void free, 8 feet high, capable of supporting attached passive and active equipment. Plywood backboards shall be painted with two coats of fire retardant white paint.   False ceilings are not allowed.

 

 

3.2.4   ANSI/TIA/EIA 606-A Color Coding

 

Color                                                     Reserved for Identification of:

 

Orange -                Demarcation point (central office termination)

Green -                   Network connections on customer side of demarcation point

Purple -                 Termination of cables originating form common equipment (e.g.,PBX’s, computers, LAN’s, and multiplexers)

White -                   First level backbone

Gray -                     Second level backbone

Blue -                     Horizontal cable (IDF to work area)

Brown -                  Interbuilding backbone (cable connecting separate buildings, BDF)

Red -                       Key telephone systems

Yellow -                 Auxiliary circuits, alarms, miscellaneous circuits.

 

3.2.5   Backbone Subsystem

 

The Backbone Subsystem a term used in TIA/EIA documents and in BICSI refers to all communication cables from the Main Distribution Frame (MDF) to the Building Distribution Frame (BDF).  It should provide the highest rate of transmission for the facility.  This subsystem provides inter-building and intra-building connection facility.

 

The function of the backbone wiring is to provide interconnections between the MDF(s) and IDF(s), or interconnection between buildings BDF(s) on the same campus. 

 

Dedicated riser cable will be installed from the MDF(s) to each BDF and to each IDF on each floor.

 

Riser cable will consist of twisted-pair ARMM, fiber optic cabling and Series-11 (formerly RG-11) coax to each BDF and IDF, configured in a star topology for CATV applications where required.

 

All IDF fiber runs will consist of multiple strands of multimode and multiple strands of single-mode, preferably as a composite cable. AHEC is now utilizing Gigabit transmission in the backbone. Consideration must be given in regards to distance of the optical fiber. The distance for legacy 62.5/125 M/M fiber when utilizing one Gigabit transmission is 220 meters (721 ft). The Distance for Standard 62.5/125 M/M fiber is 300 meters (984 ft.) Standard 50/125 M/M will support up to 600 meters (1,968 ft), while Laser Optimized OM2/OM3 fiber will support 750/1000 meters respectively. If the distance is greater, then single-mode fiber shall be used. Gigabit Ethernet will not perform properly on legacy 62.5/125 multimode fiber over 220 meters. The ANSI/TIA/EIA568-B.3 standard recommends only 50 micron fiber laser optimized, (LOMMF/OM2/OM3) for 10 Gigabit Ethernet transmission and migration to the forthcoming 40/100 gigabit standard.

 

BDF backbone copper and fiber minimum requirements shall be determined by totaling the fiber and copper, which are fed between BDF and IDF’s, and dividing by two (2).  For example if there are four (4) IDF’s which each have 12 strands of multimode fiber totaling 48 strands, 24 strands will be provided between the MDF and BDF. This formula should be used for multi-mode and single-mode fiber.

 

Riser cable shall be ARMM-type cable composed of materials meeting the UL classifications for use in riser shafts without the need for conduit.  In addition, the riser cable must be rated for use as a riser cable per the National Electric Code 800-53 (B).

 

Fiber optic cable shall be certified to meet or exceed the current American National Standards Institute (ANSI) TIA/EIA568B.3 Standard. (delete old stand?)

 

Electrical Metal Tubing (EMT) conduit or cable tray, at a minimum, shall be used to house all backbone copper and fiber optic cable within a building, except in vertical riser shafts, in which steel sleeves shall be used as the routing shaft (see below). All backbone cable shall be secured to a permanent building fixture at intervals not to exceed every 10 feet.  Water sprinkler pipes shall never be used to secure or ground any cabling.  Discretion shall be used in the placement plan and installation of intra-building cabling to fully utilize already existing individual conduits and to avoid the need to install new.  A fully utilized conduit is at its maximum when it reaches a 50% not to exceed 60% fill ratio. (Unless manufactures requirements differ)

 

Backbone access holes between floors shall consist of four (4) inch steel (EMT as a minimum) sleeves.  These should extend between two (2) and four (4) inches above the floor to provide water protection.  After cables are installed, the sleeves must be appropriately fire stopped with, approved putty (see Fire Stops) this includes any unused sleeves.

 

Empty conduit will be supplied with pull cords, this will facilitate future pulls.  Fiber optic cable shall be housed in inner-duct, EMT conduit, or armor jacket, listed for the environment in which it is installed.

 

All newly installed conduits, cable trays and other pathways shall be used to support and protect only the communications cabling.  Under no circumstances shall electrical cabling be co-located within any conduit or raceway used to route communications cabling.

 

The installation of the cable should be as straight as possible.  Routing should be along hallways using adjacent walls of the corridors whenever possible, perpendicular to the building lines.  Routing should be in common areas wherever possible and areas of restricted access should be avoided.

 

No section of conduit shall be longer than 100 feet or contain more than two (2) 90º bends between pull points or pull boxes.

 

Pull or splice boxes shall be placed in an exposed manner and location, and readily accessible.  Pull boxes shall not be placed in a fixed false ceiling space unless immediately above a marked, hinged panel.  A pull box shall be placed in a conduit run where the length is over 100 ft, there are more than two (2) 90º bends, or if there is a reverse bend in the run.

 

Riser ARMM cables metallic sheath shall be bonded at each end to an approved ground.

 

The backbone cabling shall use the hierarchical star topology. Each horizontal cross-connect in a telecommunications room TR (IDF) is cabled either directly to a main cross-connect (MDF) or to an intermediate cross-connect (BDF), then to a main cross-connect (MDF). There shall be no more than two hierarchical levels of cross-connect in the backbone cabling. From the horizontal cross-connect, no more than one cross-connect shall be passed through to reach the main cross-connect (MDF). Therefore, connections between any two horizontal cross-connects shall pass through three or fewer cross-connect facilities.

 

3.2.6   Horizontal Subsystem

 

The Horizontal Subsystem is the portion of the wiring system that extends from the Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) to the outlet.  All work area outlet horizontal cable will be unshielded, Category 6, 24 AWG.  This cable must meet the performance specifications as defined in (Chapter 1.5). Horizontal cable shall be certified to meet or exceed the electrical performance specifications.

Cable installation and termination practices shall be in compliance with TIA/EIA 568-B.1 Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard Part 1: General Requirements Pair untwisting at termination shall not exceed .5 inches.  Kinks and sharp 90º bends are not allowed.  The minimum bend radius for Category 6 cable shall not be less than two (2) inches. All horizontal cable shall be installed without bridges, splices, or taps.

 

All horizontal cable in plenum return ceilings shall be plenum rated and must be classified as meeting the low flame spread and smoke producing characteristics of the National Electric Code, Section 800-53 (A), as determined by the Underwriters Laboratories. The local Authority Having Jurisdiction must approve cable jacket type no matter what environment it is being installed in prior to a Request For Quote being sent out for bid.

 

Typical work area outlets shall be of a modular design that will allow for the easy transition to other connector types as needed in the future.  Four (4) individual cables shall be pulled to each work area outlet in a star topology, with four (4) pairs per sheath. (Rooms will require one (1), two (2), and four (4) individual cable and jack configurations.)  Wall phone locations will typically use a single cable configuration with an 8 position jack in a stainless steel faceplate while most other locations will use the four-cable configuration and a four-jack faceplate.  All 8 conductors in each 4-pair cable shall be terminated on an 8 position modular jack. (See Appendix A) for approved recommended hardware. Communications cabling shall not be used until it has been tested.  All records and test results must be submitted electronically to the Account/Project Manager prior to the release of final payments.

 

Only the T568B pin configuration standard as specified in the EIA/TIA 568-B.1 standard will be supported.  All eight (8) conductors of the 8-position/8-conductor information outlet will be terminated.

 

All horizontal cables shall be installed with a minimum 6” to 8” slack behind each work area outlet to facilitate troubleshooting and repairs.  In addition 8’ to 10’ service slack shall be left above the ceiling at the IDF/TR.

 

 

 

 

3.2.7  Work Area Subsystem

 

The Work Area Subsystem refers to all communication cable from the outlet to the station equipment.  Work area wiring may vary in form depending on the application. Any area requiring communications related services must be considered.  All work area cordage must be factory terminated approved products.

 

3.2.8   Existing Building Renovations

 

All IDF’s/TR’s requiring more than 50% re-cabling for renovations shall be brought up to ACTC standards.  All renovations to IDF’s/TR’s, add, move, and change cabling not meeting the requirements to upgrade shall use Category 6 cable for all new dual/quad drops.

 

3.2.9   Pathways

 

Backbone pathways consist of intra-building and inter-building pathways.  Backbone pathways may be either vertical or horizontal.  Inter-building backbone pathways extend between buildings.  Intra-building pathways are contained within a building.  Alternate routing and pathway redundancy requirements for critical areas should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis with each construction project.  Backbone pathways shall comply with the TIA/EIA 569-B standard:

 

Horizontal pathways shall have two (2) 100mm (4 inch) steel (EMT at a minimum) sleeves, installed within each intermediate distribution frame, extending to an area above the access ceiling in the corridor to allow for routing and pulling of the horizontal runs.

 

All horizontal cables shall be routed above the ceiling grid so that a minimum distance of 5” is maintained between any cabling and fluorescent lighting fixtures, sources of electrostatic discharge, radiated frequency interference or areas of high electromagnetic radiation.  Installation areas that will not support this standard such as heavily ducted spaces above lighting or electrical sources of interference may require conduit or alternate routing.

 

All new construction shall utilize ventilated cable trays (wire basket type), routed within the hallway or corridor ceiling of the floor it will feed to allow for easier installation of horizontal runs. Minimum clearance shall be 12 inches on one side of the cable tray, 12 inches on the top of the cable tray, and 3 inches above finished ceiling to allow for the removal of tiles. Raised flooring systems should also utilize cable trays beneath the floor for proper communications cable management. Cable tray shall be used for all main horizontal pathways. The tray shall be the basket type such as Flextray, Cablofil or B-Line. The depth and width will vary depending on amounts of cabling being installed. Refer to the manufacturer’s installation guidelines for supports and fill.

 

All individual cable supports, when needed (J-hooks) shall be installed every 4’ to 5’ft staggered through open ceiling. Plenum rated “Velcro” shall be the only means of securing cable bundles.

 

All new construction should utilize ¾” or larger conduit stubs from each information outlet to accessible ceiling space and pointed horizontally toward cable tray utilizing a swept 90°, hallway or logical cable distribution point.  Outlet boxes shall be 4” square (4s box) and deep as possible with single-gang rings.

 

Wire molding shall be used to conceal all exposed horizontal cabling (i.e., surface mount information outlets).

 

Non-metallic flexible conduit with sweep 90° elbows shall be used to transition from floor pedestals, conduits or outlet boxes to furniture system baseboards and raceways.

 

 

3.2.10  Conduits

Completed wire/cable installations in conduit shall not exceed 50% fill ratio, not to exceed 60% finished loading factor of the available conduit space. All conduits entering offices shall start initially as 3/4" conduit attached to a 4" square box. Conduit run for 3/4" shall be no longer than 100 feet otherwise a J-box is required. A 3/4" pipe shall carry no more than four (4)  4-pair cables.

 

As per the ANSI/TIA/EIA 569-B Standard the following conduit fills shall apply

Conduit size                                           Number of Cat-6 Cables @ .220 diameter                           

 

¾”                                            4                                                              5                              _________________

1”                                            8                                                              8                                                               

1 ¼”                                         16                                                            15                                                           

1 ½”                                         20                                                            21                                                           

2”                                            36                                                            35                                                           

2 ½”                                         64                                                            50                                                           

4”                                            150                                                          133

 

 

 

In hard ceiling areas conduits shall stub up into the ceiling from the 4" box and route to the wire/cable tray. In a drop ceiling area conduits shall stub into the ceiling and have a swept 90º bend. Typical installations shall use a double or a single device plaster ring opening. Conduit between junctions shall not be smaller than 3/4". Conduit ends shall have compression type connectors with bushings. Setscrews are not approved.

There shall be no more than the equivalent of two  (2) 90º bends.

Example:  Two (2) 90º bends or any combination totaling 180º in a conduit run, without the installation of a pull box.

Bonding and grounding of backbone pathways and cables shall comply with  J-STD-607-A standards and applicable electric codes. 

3.3   Distance Limitations

 

Distance limitations should be considered with respect to cable type and application.  All subsystems, cross-connect wires and connection cables must be included in the entire cable length distance calculations.  Some distance limitations may be overcome by selecting more appropriate media.  If distance limitations are exceeded the support of future applications could be compromised.

 

Table 1:  Backbone Cable Distance Standards

 

The total length of transmission cable between the telecommunications closet or equipment room and the intermediate cross-connect (including to and from any intermediate cross-connects) depends upon the cable type used as shown below, as per TIA/EIA 568-B.1

 

HorizontalCross-Connect(HC) IntermediateCross-Connect(IC) to (BDF)Horizontal cross-connect (HC) (IDF) MainCross-Connect(MC) to (MDF)Intermediate cross-connect (IC) (BDF) TotalDistance (MDF to BDF to IDF)
62.5/125mm& 50/125mmOptical Fiber Cable 300 m (984 ft.)Max. 1,700m (5575 ft.)(See note 1) 2,000m (5575 ft.)(note 4)
100-OhmUTP Cable 300 m (984 ft.)Max. 500 m (1640 ft.)(See Note 2) 800 m (1640 ft.)(See Note 2)
100-OhmSTP Cable        (See note 3)
Single-Mode Fiber 300 m (984 ft.)Max. 2,700 m (8855 ft.) 3,000 m (8855 ft.)(note 4)

 

 

Note 1:  When the HC to IC distance is less than max., the IC to MC distance can be increased accordingly to a max. of 2,000 meters (6,560 ft.). The same note applies for Single mode with the distance limitation of 3000 meters (8855 ft.)

 

Note 2:  When the HC to IC distance is less than max., the IC to MC distance can be increased accordingly to a max. 800 meters (2,624ft.).

 

Note 3:  Recommended to a max. 90 meters (295ft.).  Total length between active equipment connections should not be greater than 100 meters (328ft.).

 

Note 4:  In the ever increasing demand for bandwidth the distance limitation for fiber has more dependents on application than core size. Refer to ANSI/TIA/EIA 568-B.1 Table E-1 (pg. 72) for distance limitation per application. See also 568-B.3 and 568-C.3.

 

 

This section under construction still….to add mnf spec. verbage and photos Chapter 4  - PRODUCT SECTION

 

4.1 General

A.        All materials and installation techniques used shall be per industry standards.

B.        All components provided shall have been thoroughly tested and proven in actual use.

C.        Product substitutions

1.        No deviations from the specified product manufacturer’s products will be allowed without prior approval from the ACTC committee.

2.        Contractor(s) may submit requests for approval of equal products or  materials.  Written requests shall be submitted to the project owner and design engineer for review within the specified time before the bid.

3.        No requests for substitutions will be considered after bid opening.

 

 

4.1.2  Fiber Optic cable types:

 

High data rate applications such as 10 Gigabit Ethernet and the forthcoming 40/100 Gbps Ethernet Standard have changed the way fiber optic cabling is being selected for premises networks.  The prevalent recommendations as specified in recently released standards in the last 3 years specify multimode, laser optimized 50/125 micron optical fiber (OM3), standard 50/125 micron and grandfathered 62.5/125 micron fiber for new and retrofit environments. Single-mode 8 -10 micron is also specified for expansive campus environments and some video and specialty applications. Hybrids of these are preferred by the committee.  These are the acceptable fiber types per ACTC standards and will be specifically identified in project specific documents as required.  Refer to msudenver.edu/actc (Network Construction standards and Network IT requirements and State of Colorado Technical Consultant recommendations on a project to project basis).  Add URL (Dave) the url is https://www.msudenver.edu/actc/ not sure why it doesn’t work?

 

4.1.3   Copper cable Types:

 

1Gbe, 10Gbe, 40/100Gbe, Video applications such as streaming video and teleconferencing, Multi-Megapixel surveillance cameras and emerging technologies such as PoE Plus are driving the adoption of Category 6a cabling as the recommended horizontal media to accommodate technology refreshes and the addition of these applications to the environment without the need for re-cabling and should be highly considered to help reduce the cost of ownership over time and ensure our cabling plant will support the proposed 20 year plan. Category 6 cabling is a minimum recommendation for VoIP and current data networking applications.   

 

 

4.2    Termination Hardware

 

4.2.1 General

 

The mechanical termination hardware is used to provide a means of connecting and cross-connecting wiring systems.  It also provides a means of connecting the building wiring system to the network equipment.

 

4.2.2 100 Ω ohm UTP

 

Transmission performance of UTP termination hardware must be consistent with the category of cables they terminate.  Performance requirements for Category 6 UTP connectors are documented in ANSI/TIA/EIA568B.2-1Category 6 specification. These requirements apply to, but are not limited to; work area outlets, patch panels, transition connectors and cross-connect blocks. New construction, major additions and renovations will require Enhanced Cat 6 cable to be used in plenum return spaces on plenum return air spaces. Moves, adds, and changes to existing facilities will use Standard Category 6. Check with local Electrical inspectors and local Fire Marshal before ordering any cable.

 

4.2.3 Mechanical Termination Hardware

 

It is desirable that hardware used to terminate UTP cable be of the insulation displacement connection (IDC type) and rated according to the cable category. 

 

Example:  Termination hardware for Category 6 UTP cable must be rated to support speeds up to 1.2 gigabit and support transmission rates of 250MHZ.

Termination hardware for Category 6a UTP cable must be rated to support speeds up to 10  gigabits per second and support transmission rates of 250MHZ,for 100 meter distances.

 

 Note that the same intermediate wire blocks may be utilized for both voice VoIP and data applications, where feasible.  In newly constructed IDF(s) Category 6 termination hardware will be installed in the 19” rack.  The data four (4) pair will be installed directly onto the 110 type termination hardware.

 

4.2.4 Cross-Connect and Patch Cords

 

The cross-connect jumpers and factory-terminated patch cords shall meet performance requirements and shall meet the requirements as specified in the ANSI/TIA/EIA568B.2-1Category 6 Specifications. Patch cords for new construction shall be RJ45 to 110. color coded preferred, colored labels if Cat 6a.

 

 

4.2.5 Removal of Abandoned cable

 

As per the 2004 and 2008 National Electrical Code 800-52 (B), 800-53 (B) (1), and 770-53(B) (1): Accessible portions of abandoned cables shall not be permitted to remain.

 

 

4.3  Uninterruptible Power Supplies: (UPS)

 

As more of the mission critical systems continue to converge on the IP Ethernet Enterprise, backing up these applications are required, The committee recommends mid mounted shelf UPS in each cabinet which contains critical network hardware. Solutions from Eaton Powerware, APC, Emmerson/Liebert for larger KVA apps and Tripplite or Minuteman have small to mid size solutions as well.

 

4.5  Work Area designs:

 

ACTC requires the design, manufacture, test, and installation of telecommunications cabling networks per manufacturer’s requirements and in accordance with NFPA-70 (2008 edition of the National Electrical Code®), IEEE C2 2007(NESC 2007), state codes, local codes, requirements of authorities having jurisdiction, and particularly the following standards:

  1. ANSI/NECA/BICSI-568-2006 -- Standard for Installing Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling

2.       ANSI/TIA/EIA 568-B Parts 1, 2 & 3 Commercial Building Cabling Standard

 

a)  The example below illustrates the solution orderable as a kit which includes the faceplate, four jacks of specific mnf. type and color, labels, screws and other items customized per requirement.  Kitting facilitates less labor for installation, less loss parts, reduces waste assisting in meeting Green/LEEDS requirements and improves time to install. All components are orderable under one single part number which eases ordering and paperwork for purchasing.

These kits are required for all bidders proposals.

 

Each jack will have its own individual cable number in sequential order. Different areas and classroom types will use one of these four work area kit design types listed below. 

 

EXAMPLE – Typical Kit use single gang faceplate with Series II dual enhanced Cat 6 jacks. Some applications may require specialty outlet types such as F connector for CATV or others. The drawings below detail requirements. Confirm components and design with project manager prior to purchase of kits for all projects.

 

 

b)       The preferred mnf solution is Ortronics NetClearGT2 Enhanced Category 6 with Series II system components including single gang faceplate installed on a dual gang box as pictured below:  Example only – all drops may not have all components pictured.  Trac-Jack style product and or GTX Augmented (Cat 6a) may also be used with ACTC approvals or where specified.

 

There are currently four types of cabling faceplate designs being utilized by the educational institutions. They are respectively:

 

c)       CIP Classroom Jack:  5 port Category 6/ data icon outlets – Kit Part number 387802

d)        Add Trac jack  option kit – White jacks with colored icons

e)       Add GTX Cat 6a option – White jacks with colored icons

 

 

 

f)        Computer LAB Jack:  6 port Category 6 data icon outlets – Kit Part number 387800

g)       Icons for specific services are all red (Data)

h)       Add Track Jack kit

i)         Add GTX Cat 6a kit

j)        Office Jack:  2 per room, one plate each on opposite walls or room.   Each with 2 ports of category 6 w/ red data icon (right) and yellow voice icon (left) outlets and blanks - Kit Part number 387801

k)       Add Trac Jack kit

l)         Add GTX Cat6a kit

m)     Lectern Jack:    3port Category 6 data icon outlets – Kit Part Number 388164

n)        Icons are as follows:  Violet (left), Blue (Right) and black (bottom).

o)       Add Trac Jack kit

p)       Add GTX Cat6a kit

 

Add Labeling scheme from old standard doc – please identify this?

 

Add cabling p/n’s and definitions  - Berk-Tek LANmark-1000 Enhanced Category 6 Cable . Horizontal cable color is yellow Cat 6.  Cat 6a color shall be TBD.

Patch cords – Colored cords are preferred for Category 6 systems, Category 6a will have colored labels to designate specific services.

Racks are CPI – 9’ is standard (add p/n) 7’ rack is applicable for specific projects (add P/n)  – confirm with project owner prior to purchase.

Vertical managers for 9’ are double sided, standard.  Two per rack.  Acceptable alternatives are: (add options)

Add horizontal options:  May be required on a per project basis.  CPI 2U wire managers for copper and fiber patch panels, 1U wire managers for switches. Confirm with project owner. (add options)

Fiber optics – Corning Cable Systems is our preferred manufacturer.  All fiber hardware is typically rack mounted, Model CCH-04U, unless specified otherwise on a per project basis. Terminations are typically LC.  SC connections may be specified or required on a per project basis.  Confirm with project owner.

Add p/n’s.

 

Chapter 5 – Documentation (to be added)

 

Chapter 6 - Environmental Considerations

 

6.1 Life Safety

 

Life safety code requirements are substantial in educational facilities.  Adequate corridor access, fire protection system operation and control of dust/dirt must be maintained at all times.  Doorways must be kept clear to allow movement of carts, wheelchairs, etc.  Dust can have a negative effect on some individuals and sensitive electronic equipment and thus dust abatement will be necessary.  Penetrations in firewalls must be fully sealed with approved materials. Orange Safety cones and caution tape MUST be used at all times when working in public access areas, to protect patients and employees.

 

6.2 Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

 

The MDF or BDF room will need to conform to the PBX and computer systems manufacturers’ specifications for temperature control, which generally will require the temperature to remain constant 64°F to 75°F. HVAC shall function properly 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. It should have dedicated HVAC equipment or access to the main HVAC delivery system.

 

The IDF’s should maintain a temperature 64°F to 75°F if they contain active network electronics. If the IDF does not contain active equipment the temperature should be 50°F to 95°F

 

HVAC shall be included in the design of wiring closets.  A positive pressure shall be maintained with 1 air change per hour.  Air-handling equipment must dissipate the heat generated by active devices and satisfy applicable building codes.

 

6.2.1 Humidity

 

Humidity should always be maintained at less than 85% in rooms with no active equipment.  If the room houses active equipment the humidity range should be 30% to 55% relative humidity.  Precautions shall be taken to guard against static in low humidity environments.  Static mats shall be installed in all wiring closets when required. Heat dissipation 750 to 5000 Btu per hour per cabinet. Additional environmental considerations for telecommunications equipment may require dust, and contaminant control also.

 

6.3 Lighting

 

Overhead lighting should be installed uniformly to supply at least 50-foot candles at a height of 3 feet above the floor.  Locate light fixtures a minimum of 8ft, 6” above the finished floors.  All IDF’s must have an internal light source and not rely on ambient light from outside for use by personnel.  Emergency lighting is recommended. 

 

6.4 Electrical Power

 

Each IDF should have at least two (2) four (4) isolated ground dedicated 20 amp, 110-volt ac duplex electrical outlets, each on separate circuits, for use by active electronics fed from overhead.  In addition, emergency duplex outlets shall be provided on three walls for use by wall mount equipment.  Power outlets located on the walls are to be located 18” above finished floor.

 

The MDF or BDF room will require special power considerations depending on the type of PBX and computer systems that are installed and how they are powered.

 

 

6.5 Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS)

 

Centralized UPS units shall be installed to provide regulated and continuous AC power to network equipment in equipment rooms, and all telecom (IDF/BDF/MDF) spaces. These units are typically located out of the equipment room because of total battery acid and HVAC requirements. The UPS electrical outlets in all MDF/BDF/IDF’s shall be gray in color.

 

6.6 Emergency Power

 

Emergency power should be provided to the input of the UPS units.  Equipment providing communication internally or to other buildings and sites, or for critical applications, shall be on UPS backed by emergency power.

6.7 Grounding/Bonding

 

Grounding practices shall be in compliance with the NFPA -70 (NEC 2008) (articles 800 and 250) and the Commercial Building Grounding and Bonding Requirements for Telecommunications, J-STD-607-A.  A separate and consistent grounding source (#6 AWG minimum) must be installed in each equipment room and IDF for use by the voice and data communications equipment that will be housed there. Rack and Equipment grounding jumpers are required for each rack or cabinet.  PBX equipment requires a separate ground than the main ground buss bar. Proper grounding of the systems is essential to the correct operation of all components and life expectancy.  It is important to note that ground resistance to any and all equipment connections shall not exceed .1ohms under any circumstances. All critical ground connectors shall be two (2) hole lugs, and non-critical connections shall be one (1) hole lugs. All metallic non current carrying components of the telecommunications infrastructure (i.e.: equipment racks, trays, cable shields etc.)  shall be bonded to the ground. 

 

6.8 Security

 

All rooms require controlled access with a keyless entry system or fitted lock using a master/sub-master key plan for the entire campus.  Unauthorized access to MDF/BDF/IDF rooms is prohibited and shall be strictly controlled by Campus Security, Facilities and I/T Management.

 

6.9 Fire Suppression

 

Provide dry pipe pre-action protection for the MDF. Install wire cages to prevent accidental operation of sprinkler heads.

 

The placement of a pre-action protection system must be out side of the room it is protecting. This eliminates the risk of water leakage in the equipment rooms.

 

6.9.1 Fire Seal

 

Should fire-barriers need to be penetrated during the installation of cabling, proper restoration to the original fire rating shall be followed. Each AHEC facility shall determine which product manufacture they will require; 3M, or STI EZ-Path.

 

Each penetration shall be labeled. The label shall identify the product manufacturer, UL listed assembly number, date, number of cables, and technicians name. Each technician installing the fire-stopping assemblies must have proof of training for that product. As a standard, AHEC requires a EZ-Path assembly to be used in all new construction through fire-barriers, however if the local Fire Marshall requires a “T” rating and it can not be achieved using a steel sleeve, then it is not required. All fire-barrier penetrations shall be identified on as-built drawings.

 

6.9.2       Safety

 Emergency systems Add Emergency phones and Wide Area Emergency Broadcast System – WEBS 

 

7.  Fiber Optics Installation Practices and Methods

 

7.1 General

 

All fiber optic cable shall conform to National Electrical Code Article 770, Optical Fiber Cables and Raceway. Cables installed within buildings shall be marked by the manufacturer with the appropriate certification code; OFCR and OFNR for non-plenum areas, or, OFNP and OFCP for plenum and other air-handling spaces.

 

AHEC intends to pull and/or install both multi-mode and single-mode fiber optic riser cable wherever feasible during any major cable installation project to support future data, voice, imaging, and video applications.  When a facility is installing twisted pair cable between the MDF and BDF and an IDF, both multi-mode and single-mode optical fiber should be pulled along with the UTP cabling.  Fiber and Copper should be installed in separate conduits. 

 

7.2 Multi-mode Cable

 

Multi-mode fiber optic cable shall be graded index with nominal 50/125 mm cord/cladding diameter and shall meet or exceed the requirements of ANSI/TIA/EIA -568-B.1 and 568-B.3

 

Optical fiber runs to IDF’s shall be minimum of twelve (12) strands, dual windowed, laser optimized multimode building cable, preferably as a composite cable with the single-mode fiber.  MDF to BDF runs shall be a minimum of twenty four (24) strands. Project manager shall provide final specifications on project to project basis.

 

7.3 Single-mode Cable         

 

Single-mode fiber optic cable shall be graded index nominal 8.7mm to 10.0mm core/cladding diameter with a tolerance of +/- 0.5mm at 1300nm. Single-mode optic fibers shall be Class IVa Dispersion-Unshifted Single-mode Optical Fibers and shall comply with ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.1 The maximum value of the dispersion slope at S shall be no greater than .093 ps/km-nm2. 

 

Wavelength Maximum Attenuation  
 1310nm &      1550nm 0.5dB/km Outside Plant cable(loose tube)
   1310nm &   1550nm         1.0dB/km Inside Plant cable(tight buffered)

 

 

Optical fiber runs to IDF’s if specified, shall be twelve (12) strands, dual windowed, single-mode building cable, preferably as a composite cable with the 12 strands of multi-mode fiber.  MDF to BDF runs shall be a minimum of twelve (12) strands. Project manager shall provide final specifications on project to project basis.

 

 

7.4 Fiber Optic Splicing

 

Optical fiber splices, fusion or mechanical, shall not exceed a maximum optical attenuation of 0.3dB when measured in accordance with ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7 & -526-14.  All attempts should be made to avoid the need to make a fiber-to-fiber field splice.  Inter-building fiber optic cable may only be spliced when lengths exceed one (1) kilometer or splicing when OSP cable enters a building and a transition to ISP cable is needed.

Note: The method of splicing must be approved by AHEC and be in accordance with the manufactures approved methods.

 

7.4.1 Terminations

 

When constructing any new MDF, IDF, BDF, all new fiber optic cables (single-mode and multimode) are to be terminated with “LC” - Confirm this connector type - or SC?

Type connectors. When new fiber is installed from an existing MDF to a new IDF/BDF the connectors shall be “LC” at both ends. If additional fiber is being added to an IDF, then match the existing connector type. Terminations shall not exceed a maximum optical attenuation of 0.75dB when measured in accordance with ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7 (SM) & -526-14 (MM). All attenuation measurements shall be in accordance with specifications stated in ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7 & -526-14.

 

7.4.2 Testing

 

All multi-mode fiber optic shall undergo several tests, both before and after installation.  Prior to installation, all fiber optic strands on each reel shall be tested at 850nm and 1300nm (multi-mode) and at 1310nm and 1550nm (single-mode).  All results should be equal to or better than the specifications listed above. All test results are to be provided to AHEC prior to installation.  Any reel containing fiber strands that do not meet this criteria shall be replaced by the provider. 

 

Upon completion of the fiber terminations, the Vendor shall perform 100 percent of the fiber strands test as follows – Horizontal fiber runs (if installed) 850nm one direction only. Intrabuilding backbone – Both wavelengths, one direction (at a minimum). Interbuilding – Both wavelengths, bi-directional. All Intrabuilding fiber shall be tested (at a minimum) with Light source and power meter. Interbuilding fiber shall be tested with light source and power meter, as well as an OTDR.

Adhere to all test requirements outlined in Testing Appendix add reference number.

 

7.4.3 Innerduct

 

All fiber optic cables shall be installed in innerduct unless fiber is encased in an armor sheath.  All innerduct shall be properly rated for the environment, plenum or non-plenum. Innerduct shall be installed on one side of either vertical ladder rack or horizontal raceway.  On vertical raceway, the Innerduct shall be secured every two feet at a minimum.  On horizontal raceway, the innerduct shall be secured every six (6) feet at a minimum. All Innerduct shall be listed for the environment that it is installed in.

 

8.  Data Centers

 

8.1 Twisted Pair Cable

All horizontal copper cabling shall be a Category 6a rated cable where distances exceed 37 meters.  If Category 6 cable is used, cabling must follow the TSB 155 mitigation techniques to ensure optimal performance. Testing with a Level IIIe tester must be completed. Pre –Terminated copper solutions may also be used as long as all components are of a single source mnf.

 

8.2     Fiber Optic Cable and terminating hardware

Pre-terminated fiber solutions may be used, specifically MTP trunks and harnesses designed for reducing real estate in racks and cabinets

 

 

10.  Specific use/Tenant Office Buildings - Shall we keep this section?

10.1 General

 

Establish guidelines for Specific Use Office Building communications infrastructure and provide a clear demarcation point between AHEC and the tenant spaces.

 

10.2 Cable system common services.

 

Each subsystem provides a specific function in the typical AHEC Cable plant system.  The facility subsystem provides the interconnection from building entrances to each floor. Each floor shall have a minimum of one IDF space as defined in section 3.  Each subsystem consists of:

 

  • Entrance facilities
  • Equipment rooms
  • Riser Cables
  • Cross-connects

 

10.3 Service considerations will be determined on the following factors to properly plan the size and types of communication needs.

 

  • Type and use of the building
  • Growth potential
  • Difficulty of adding pathways in the future
  • Alternate entrance
  • Requested tenant services
  • Type and size of cables likely to be installed
  • Multiple service providers

 

10.4 Connectivity

 

AHEC will provide voice and data connectivity from the floor IDF/TR to the outside entrance facility. The tenant’s responsibility is from the floor IDF/TR to their individual suite. All station cables (horizontal cables) shall remain consolidated within the tenant’s suite and only feeder cables from their suite to the IDF will be accepted into the floor IDF.  It is recommended that the tenant follow the AHEC ITS Plan within their suite to insure high quality and trouble free service. Installing Category6 / 6a cable will protect your cable investment and adapt to future technologies for many years.

 

Consisting of:

 

Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), University of Colorado – Denver (UCD), Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD), and the Community College of Denver (CCD) for the Information Technology (IT) Services departments. 


UNIVERSAL CABLE PLANT

IT Services

 

Building Infrastructure Distribution Systems

Guidelines, Methods and Standards

 

Sept 2011
Revision 2.2

FORWARD  

This document is intended to aid in the planning and implementation of information systems cable plants.  The document content comes from Auraria Higher Education Committee, Information Technology, cabling distributors, cabling vendors, latest industry standards and common practices.  Users of this document are encouraged to validate the content and send revisions, corrections and/or requests to ACTC for review.

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Departments and Members Involved in the Design Process

 

Auraria Cooperative Telecommunications Committee (ACTC)

The ACTC working group consists of the following membership:

Name:                     Department/Company/Title:                                                                               Contact info:

 

Jerry Bishop            Networking Specialist, University of Colorado – Denver                                jerry.bishop@ucdenver.edu

Pete Candelaria        Electrical Manager, Auraria Higher Education Center                                             candelariap@ahec.edu

Kent Courtnage       Media Center Specialist, Auraria Higher Education Center                                     courtnagek@ahec.edu

Steve Davis             Telecom Specialist, Auraria Higher Education Center                                             sdavis@ahec.edu

Amparo Garcia        Network Engineer, Metropolitan State College of Denver                                      garciaam@mscd.edu

Iwona Haga             Network Engineer, Metropolitan State College of Denver                                      ihaga@mscd.edu

Randy Hagan          Senior Network Engineer, University of Colorado – Denver                        randy.hagan@ucdenver.edu

Greg Reese              Networking Specialist, Auraria Higher Education Center                                       ReeseG@AHEC.edu

Philip Kyburz          Networking Specialist, Community College of Denver                                          phkyburz@ccd.edu

Doug McLean         Facilities Manager, Auraria Higher Education Center                                             mcleand@ahec.edu

David Schuette        Senior Network Engineer, Architect, Metropolitan State College of Denver           schuettd@mscd.edu

Brian Stevenson      Network Manager, University of Colorado – Denver                                 brian.stevenson@ucdenver.edu

 

Confidentiality Statement

 

Material contained in these standards documents are confidential to Auraria Cooperative Telecommunications Committee (ACTC) and is provided to contractors, vendors, consultants and staff for the sole purpose of designing and budgeting infrastructure for campus buildings and select other properties.  Do not copy or redistribute any information without consent from a committee member. These documents are intellectual property of Auraria Higher Education Committee, and Anixter, Inc. and may contain proprietary customer information and should not be copied or used without consent.  If there are any concerns regarding the content and nature of this information, please contact an ACTC member or Anixter, Inc. Denver , CO for updates.

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS  - requires additional formatting when document is done.

 

Chapter 1 Introduction

                                                                                                                                                                                               

1.1       Purpose

1.2       Scope

1.3       Applicable Standards & Adherence

1.4       Service Considerations

                                       

1.5  Performance specification (or mnf. preference)

1.6  Contractor Certifications/Qualifications

Chapter 2 Planning

2.1 Overview

2.2 Definitions

2.3 Specific Design Specifications and Construction Requirements

 

Chapter 3 Horizontal Infrastructure

3.1 General

3.2 Cable Subsystems and Media Types

3.3 Distance limitations

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Chapter 4  Products      (Section needs more updating with BTO specs & sol photos etc)

4.1 General

4.2 100 Ω UTP

                      4.3 Termination Hardware

 

Chapter 5 Documentation                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                                                                       

Chapter 6 Environmental Considerations - Life Safety

 

Chapter 7 Fiber Optics Installation Practices & Methods

 

Chapter 8 Data Centers

 

Chapter 10  Specific use Tennant Office Buildings

 

 

Appendices:

A:  Producers of Codes & Standards & Contact information

B:  Testing Procedures

C:  Wireless – Wired For Mobility and Network Equipment

D:  LEEDs and Green Best Practices

E:  Submittals requirements for RFP’s

F:  Network, Audio Visual and Television Equipment     (Not written yet, need more input and requirements)                       

                                                                  

G:  Emergency and Inter/Intra Building Life Safety Infrastructure  WEBS

H;  Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations

 

 

 

1.  INTRODUCTION

A.  This section describes the codes, standards, specifications, recommendations, and practices required for construction at the Auraria Campus. The Auraria Campus is comprised of four institutions: Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), University of Colorado – Denver (CUD), Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD), and the Community College of Denver (CCD) for the Information Technology (IT) Services departments.  They form a group called Auraria Cooperative Telecommunications Committee (ACTC). Division 27 applies to all telecommunications projects at Auraria Campus.

 

B.  The project general contractor (GC) is responsible for building telecommunications pathways and spaces as per the requirements described in this document.  The project GC shall provide these specific items: spaces (telecommunications rooms, telecommunications entrance faculty, and equipment rooms), pathways (riser and horizontal distribution), grounding system, and fire suppression systems, as described below.  AHEC is responsible, through its contractor, for providing cabling, data networking, and voice equipment.

 

C.  Corrections, comments, questions, or omissions shall be submitted to AHEC via the project manager.

 

1.1.     Purpose

 

The purpose of this document is to provide cable plant design criteria, specifications, installation and maintenance guidelines for a structured voice and data wiring system or Information Transport System (ITS) to support network applications requiring speeds up to 1.2 gigabit in the horizontal infrastructure, and 10 Gigabit for campus backbone and data center areas with support for migration to 40/100 Gigabit speeds where possible without re-cabling. This document is intended for the use of new and retrofit construction for the Auraria Higher Education Committee (AHEC) and affiliated campus facilities.

 

The telecommunications requirements reflected in this document should be incorporated into the initial programming phase for all new construction projects.

 

This document should improve building design productivity by eliminating the need to design building wiring from ground for each building.  This will result in reduced labor costs with service delivery improvements.  

 

Adherence to this document will enable support of non-IT applications in a consistent and cost effective manner.

 

 

1.2.   Scope

 

This document defines the minimum requirements for information system wiring within AHEC.  It covers the physical, electrical, environmental and maintenance requirements for the various communication equipment rooms and areas required to support communications.

 

This document covers only the passive wiring system and facilities design.  The specific components included are:

 

  • Copper and fiber transmission media
  • Equipment rooms
  • Telecommunications rooms
  • Telecommunications outlet and work area
  • Connecting and terminating hardware; cables, cords, cross-connect wires
  • Racks, trays and other support hardware
  • Grounding and bonding

 

This document does not address active network components, such as, routers, switches and hubs, however suggests appropriate Surge Suppression and UPS systems be considered as part of the infrastructure planning and implementation for racks and cabinets.

 

Planning, design and installation of wiring into a new building and the complete or partial retrofit of an existing building are covered.  Wiring of legacy systems to total Category 6 and or 6a compliance is covered.

 

Note:  This is a living document.  The criteria contained in this document are subject to revision and updating as warranted.

 

 

1.3.   Standards Adherence Overview

 

The communications cable plant system is composed of several smaller subsystems.  Together, these subsystems provide the physical transmission facility for voice and data services within a building or a campus network.

 

All of these sections are essential to the cabling plan and are addressed in this document.  It should be noted that the governing standards behind this and contact information are listed in Appendix – add reference:

 

A.  Applicable Codes, Standards, and Specifications.

 

1.  The following table of codes, standards, specifications, recommendations, and methods and procedures (M&P) are applicable to the provisioning of telecommunications services for ACTC.  They are incorporated by reference.

 

      Number Title
NFPA 70 National Electric Code (NECÒ) (2008)
IEEE C2 National Electric Safety Code (NESC)
IEEE 802.3-1998 Information Technology-Local and Metropolitan Area Networks - Part 3: Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) Access Method and Physical Layer Specifications
IEEE 802.3 100BaseFX Two fiber Multimode 100Mbps transmission for local & metropolitan area networks
1000Base- T 4 pair 100 ohm Category 5e/6 balanced copper cabling @ 100meters
1000Base- SX Short wavelength transceivers @ 260 meters for 62.5micron fiber and 550 meters 50 micron fiber @ 1 Gbps using 850nm optics
1000Base-LX Long wavelength transceivers @ 440 meters for 62.5micron fiber and 550 meters 50 micron fiber, 3Km on Single-mode @ 1 Gbps using 1300 nm optics
ISO/IEC/11801 International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnical Commission(IEC) 11801 Generic Cabling for Customer Premises (2002-2008) 
IEEE 802.3an Physical Layer and Management Parameters for 10 Gb/s Operation, Type 10Gbase-T (2006) 
IEEE 802.3af Power Over Ethernet Standard - 2003
IEEE 802 3at (Pending) Power Over Ethernet Plus Standard – Latest Draft
ANSI/TIA/EIA American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA)/ Electronic Industries Association (EIA) –568-B -Commercial Building Telecommunications Wiring Standards (2000-2008) 
ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard (Parts 1, 2, and 3)
ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.2-ad10 Transmission Performance Specifications for 4-pair 100 ohm Augmented Category 6 Cabling
   
ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-C.0 (Pending) Generic Telecommunications Cabling For Customer Premises Standard
ANSI/TIA/EIA-569-B Commercial Building Standard for Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces
ANSI/TIA/EIA-606-A Administration Standard for the Telecommunications Infrastructure of Commercial Buildings
J-STD-607-A Commercial Building Grounding (Earthing) and Bonding Requirements for Telecommunications
ANSI/TIA/EIA-758 Customer-Owned Outside Plant Telecommunications Cabling Standard
ANSI/TIA/EIA-862 Building Automation Systems Cabling Standard for Commercial Buildings
ANSI/TIA-942 Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard for Data Centers
ANSI/NECA/BICSI-568-2006 Installing Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling
ANSI/TIA-1005 Telecommunications Standard For Industrial Premises
ISO/IEC 11801 Generic Cabling For Customer Premises
BICSI® A Telecommunications Association (Building Industry Consulting Services International)Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual (TDMM), 11th Ed.; Network Design Reference Manual, 5th Ed.; Customer-Owned Outside Plant Design Manual 3rd Ed.; Wireless Design Reference Manual, 2nd Ed; Electronic Safety and Security Design Reference Manual, 1st Ed.; AV Design Reference Manual, 1st Ed.
OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.268
LEED Leadership in Energy and Environment Design, Voluntary National Standard being embraced by end-users.  Point system for End-User Certification of Green construction  
USGBC   United States Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org

                                   

 

2.  Requests for variations from code shall be submitted to the ACTC Code Committee via the project manager and must have ACTC approval.  The ACTC Code Committee will either disapprove or approve the request.  Approved code variation requests shall be then forwarded to the ACTC for consideration.  In general, requests for code variations shall not be looked upon favorably.  Variations from standards may be authorized by ACTC on a case-by-case basis and must be requested in writing by the designer through the project manager.

 

3.  ACTC will provide design parameters for the distribution systems and for systems in individual buildings, and ACTC shall be consulted during project design through the assigned project manager.

 

 

 

 

 

1.4.   Service Considerations

 

The following is a list of common services and systems that should be considered when the wiring infrastructure is designed:

 

  • Voice Services
  • Data Communications
  • Control Systems (Facilities Management Systems)
  • Patient Monitoring Systems (Technology Management Systems)
  • Security Systems and Surveillance
  • Audio Video Services
  • Wireless

 

1.5         Performance Specification / Manufacturer preference

 

A.      The ACTC committee has specified BerkTec Ortronics as our tuned solution manufacturer preference. Berk-Tek LANmark-1000 Enhanced Category 6 Cable (Plenum/Non-Plenum/Limited Combustible) Category 6 with Ortronics TracJack or Series II style as appropriate to fit the modular jack and faceplate used  Series II design hardware is preferred. Substitutions shall only be allowed with prior submittal of all component specifications to the committee in advance of bid due dates. Unanimous agreement by committee members and complete verified interoperability with any existing cabling system already in place within the building or project area in question is required.

 

1.6     Contractor Qualifications and quality assurance  

 

A.      The Telecommunications contractor must be an approved Ortronics Certified Installer at a Plus tier (CIP, CIP-GOLD, CIP-PLATINUM, and multi-site/national contractors ) and/or Berk-Tek Certified OASIS Integrator.  A copy of certification documents must be submitted with the quote in order for such quote to be valid.  The Telecommunications contractor is responsible for workmanship and installation practices in accordance with the Ortronics CI/CIP Program and Berk-Tek OASIS Program.  Ortronics/Berk-Tek will extend a NetClear 25-year Static, Dynamic and Applications Warranty to the end user once the Telecommunications contractor fulfills all requirements under Ortronics CI/CIP and/or Berk-Tek OASIS Program.  At least 30 percent of the copper installation and termination crew must be certified by BICSI, Berk-Tek, or Ortronics with a Technicians Level of Training.  Also, at least 10 percent of the optical fiber installation and termination crew must be certified by Berk-Tek or Ortronics or other approved organizations in Optical Fiber installation and termination practices.

B.      The Electrical Contractor (EC) is responsible for furnishing and installing all 110VAC circuits where required.

C.      The EC is responsible for furnishing and installing all conduit junction boxes and standard back-boxes, as required for voice data and/or security system wiring.

D.      The Voice Data contractor is responsible for furnishing and installing all low voltage, control and communications wiring.

All materials shall conform strictly to the standards and specifications set forth in this document.  Unless otherwise specified, all products furnished shall be designed, built, and installed in accordance with the latest and best practice of the electrical industry, and shall conform to the standards of the NEMA, ANSI, TIA/EIA, ICEA, IEEE, and NEC, and this specification wherever they apply.

 

Contractor personnel shall be qualified to perform the work and be knowledgeable in the following standards, skills and activities as applicable:

1.       TIA/EIA 568B and addenda, 569B and addenda, 606A and addenda, and 607A Standards.

2.       Bonding and grounding where required.

3.       Testing conductors for electrical continuity.

4.       Testing conductors and fiber circuits for performance compliance.

5.       Manufacturer Certified cable terminations for specified connectors and terminations for copper and fiber cables.

Contractor personnel will be required to provide and use proper tools in the performance of each activity.  The tools must be in good working order.  The project owner reserves the right to review the tool lists and the tool maintenance procedures of the contractor.

 

Testing and Reports

When work under these specifications is complete, Contractor shall test continuity and performance of all wiring to verify, and provide point to point labeling. Provide written documentation of test results which indicate that all wiring is free of shorts, opens, or other failures and that any required grounds or shields are terminated properly.

Contractor shall repair or replace any cable and connectivity failing any test.

Quality Assurance

All equipment shall equal or exceed the minimum requirements of ANSI/TIA, Underwriters Labs, NEMA, and NEC.

All materials and equipment furnished shall be new and unused and free from defects.

Cabling components shall be the product of one manufacturer and category type within the cabling channel. The only exception will be in the event of an authorized system retrofit or upgrade to the next higher category of compliance, where a phased approach within the cable channel is implemented ie: replacement of patch cords, connectors or panels with a higher category product.

All materials shall bear labels attesting to Underwriters Laboratory approval, provided a standard is established for the material in question.

 

  2.  PLANNING

 

2.1. Overview

 

  The planning, design and implementation process of a building infrastructure system is a complex operation.  Pre-planning to design a flexible, reliable distribution infrastructure system will ensure enhanced communications capabilities.

 

This planning should begin during the programming phase of new building construction, or a major renovation project.  The following are basic guidelines to be used only as tools to better understand the considerations involved in planning and design. 

 

2.11  To facilitate provisioning of telecommunications services, the architect/engineer shall provide ACTC with floor plan drawings for new building construction and major renovation projects during design and at construction.  CAD drawings of the Electrical/Communications plans shall be provided to AHEC upon release of construction document through the project manager.

 

2.12  The project’s technology consultant shall meet with the building’s projected occupants, ACTC Standards Sub Committee, and other interested parties to determine the telecommunications requirements of the occupants. Compliance with overall campus telecommunications plans will also be validated during these meetings.  The technology consultant shall submit all findings to ACTC for review and approval.

 

2.13  The preliminary plans, indicating service locations and space requirements, will be returned to project managers for inclusion in the final plans.

 

2.14.  Wherever possible or required, solutions and suppliers adhering to LEEDs Certification programs and offering LEEDS points shall be utilized for construction, materials supply and handling. This will potentially enable financial benefits in many areas for each participating educational institution moving forward.

 

2.2.  Consult with ACTC for the following.

 

2.21.  Acceptability for specific substitutions of specified products.

 

2.22. Guidance in the application of a standard or specification in a non-listed or design situation.

 

2.23.  Approval for deviation from standards and specifications or industry-standard methods and procedures if indicated by special circumstances.

 

2.3.  Workmanship.  All materials and equipment shall be installed in accordance with recommendations of the manufacturer as approved by the architect, to conform to initial design requirements or specification’s and contract documents. 

 

2.4  Project Deliverables – applicable to all AHEC projects.

 

In addition to any delivery requirements identified in the subcontract the selected vendor on any project will execute with the General Contractor, ACTC Committee IT Operations requires the following deliverables:

 

2.41 Acceptance Testing:   Each phase of the project will require acceptance testing. All tests must be performed according to the test criteria listed in Appendix – add reference .  The acceptance test plans will be developed by the contractor and approved by ACTC Committee, GC and the manufacturer.   ACTC Committee IT Operations reserves the right to stop work on all or parts of the project until acceptance criteria is met.  Deliverables include: the acceptance test plan, summary of notes for each test and a final “sign off” from ACTC Committee IT, GC, and the manufacturer acknowledging acceptance of each phase of the project and the final integrated structured cable infrastructure.

 

2.42   As Built Drawings:    As built drawings will be provided for two purposes.  The contractor will work with GC to incorporate structured cable infrastructure into overall site drawings maintained by ACTC Committee facilities management.  In addition to the as built drawings for ACTC Committee facilities, the contractor will provide separate CAD drawings showing the cable details for each segment of the project down to the desktop connection.  The drawing will be provided in both hard copy prints and soft copy for future modification by ACTC Committee.  The as built drawings will include an integrated materials summary for ACTC Committee to conduct post installation asset management.

 

The drawings provided for the MC and TC’s should include both a floor plan layout as well as elevations for the racks and cable management systems.

 

2.43   Documentation:  Each product or service delivered to ACTC Committee will be accompanied with product specification details and operations guides.

 

In addition to product documentation, a complete labeling plan will be provided to ACTC Committee that shows where each connection is terminated and the function it performs.  The labeling plan should be integrated into the as built CAD drawings provided to ACTC Committee IT Operations.

 

 

 

2.5  DEFINITIONS

 

A.  Telecommunications.  Any transmission, emission, or reception of signs, signals, writings, images, and sounds, or information of any nature by wire, radio, visual, or other electromagnetic systems.  Includes, but is not limited to, voice communications networks, Local Area Networks (LAN), Wide Area Networks (WAN), and Local Exchange Carriers (LEC).

 

B.  Telecommunications Room (TR).  A floor serving facility for housing telecommunications equipment, cable terminations, cross-connections, and network electronics.  The TR is the recognized transition point between the building backbone and the horizontal pathway facilities.

 

C.  Equipment Room (ER).  A campus serving space.  An ER houses primary system electronics, power, cooling, and media distribution for a campus or groups of buildings.  The Communications Center in Arts Classroom Building is an example of a campus serving ER.  ERs require extensive planning due to their size, nature, scope, and complexity.  ERs are not typically required for most projects.

 

D.  Telecommunications Entrance Facility (TEF).  Serves as the entry point into a building for the campus backbone media.  TEFs interconnect the building backbone to campus backbone.  The TEF is where conductive copper media receives it primary protection from sustained hazardous voltages.  Therefore, significant wall space in the TEF may be required for primary protection of copper circuits.  Also called the Service Entrance (SE).

 

E.  Telecommunications Main Grounding Busbar (TMGB).  The building’s main telecommunications grounding point.  The TMGB is busbar placed in the TEF, ER, or a selected TR to provide interconnection to the building’s power ground via a bonding conductor for telecommunications.

 

F.  Telecommunications Grounding Busbar (TGB).  A common point of connection for telecommunications systems and equipment for bonding to ground.  TGBs are required in all TRs and ERs.

 

G.  Telecommunications Bonding Backbone (TBB).  A conductor that electrically interconnects the TMGB to all TGBs.

 

H.  Grounding Equalizer (GE).  A conductor used to interconnect two or more vertical TBBs in multistory buildings.  Previously called a Telecommunications Bonding Backbone Interconnecting Bonding Conductor (TBBIBC). 

 

I.  Network.  Backbone media and electronics for transport of electronic information between campus entities.

 

J.  Horizontal Distribution.  The facility used for installation of media from the TR to the work area.  Usually consists of cable tray and J-hooks to the work area faceplate.

 

K.  Work Area (WA).  A building space where the occupant generally interacts with the telecommunications equipment.  WAs are typically defined as 100 ft2 of usable space.

 

L.  Building backbone.  The pathways between floors for distribution of media.  Building backbone was previously called riser cabling.

 

M.  Campus backbone.  The pathways and media that provide connectivity between the Communication Center in the Arts Classroom Building and all other buildings on the Auraria Campus (AHEC).  The campus backbone provides connectivity between buildings.  The campus backbone represents the outside plant (OSP) infrastructure.

 

N.  AHEC Telecom Services.  Department responsible for telecommunications on the Auraria campus.

O. Technology Consultant.  A firm or member of a firm that has considerable technology design experience and possesses working knowledge and subject matter expertise in telecommunications code (NEC and NESC), industry standards (see TIA/EIA commercial standards in references), and BICSI methods and procedures (Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, LAN Design Manual, and Customer-Owned Outside Plant Design Manual). 

 

1.  State of Colorado, Purchasing maintains a list of pre-screened technology consultants that can be obtained from the project manager. 

 

2.  Technology consultants used for ACTC projects shall be selected from the pre-screened technology consultant list.

 

3.  Technology consultants not listed on the pre-screened technology consultant list must meet with State of Colorado, Purchasing for certification and possible inclusion on the list.  Firms vying for campus technology consultant designation must possess a registered communication distribution designer (RCDD) on staff.  The RCDD must be thoroughly familiar with campus standards and methods and procedures and be dedicated to the assigned project. 

 

2.6  SPECIFIC DESIGN SPECIFICATION AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

 

A.  Telecommunications Entrance Facility (TEF) or Service Entrance (SE).

 

1.  All buildings require a TEF.  The TEF serves as the entry point into a building for the campus backbone media.  TEFs interconnect the building backbone to the campus backbone.  The TEF shall be solely dedicated to telecommunications services.  Space shall not be shared with electrical installations other than those designed and intended for telecommunications.  The TEF shall be vertically aligned or stacked with the TRs to facilitate interconnection with the floors above and below.  ACTC must be consulted if the TEF does not align with the building’s TRs.

 

2.  TEFs may be co-located inside TRs or ERs, depending on the size of the building they support.  Buildings larger than 100,000 ft2 may require a dedicated TEF.  Buildings with 5 or more stories shall have a shared TR/TEF that is a minimum size of 10’ x 16’.  These larger TEFs shall support 5 equipment racks, with one rack being dedicated to fiber optics cable management.  TEF ceiling height shall be a minimum of 8’ 6”. 

                                      

 

3.  The TEF shall be dry and free from the danger of flooding.  The TEF shall not be located where water ingress is possible or probable.  No water or drain piping shall be routed through the TEF that is not associated with TEF equipment.  Steam, heat, and any other source of environmental hazard shall be avoided.  

 

4.  TEF location should be carefully considered.  Accessibility for the delivery of equipment as well as expansion should be provided for.  TR location must also be designed for maximum cable lengths as specified in associated documents listed in References. 

 

5.  The TEF location should not be adjacent to any source of electromagnetic interference (EMI).  The TEF shall be located away from sources of EMI at a distance which will reduce the interference to 3.0 V/m throughout the deployed frequency range.  Interference may not exceed 3.0 V/m throughout the usable bandwidth of the communications cabling.  Bandwidth for telecommunications is up to 500 MHz.

 

6.  Typical equipment requirements have a temperature range from 64°F to 75°F (18°C to 24°C) with a desired non-condensing, relative humidity range from 30% to 55%.  Humidifiers are not typically required in TEFs.  Fan coil units are the required cooling solution in TEFs.  Typically 20,000 BTUs of cooling are required in the TEF.  Consult ACTC for specific TEF cooling requirements.  Temperature sensors shall be configured for alarm reporting and HVAC support units shall be installed on emergency power.

 

7.  The TEF is where conductive copper media receives it primary protection from sustained hazardous currents.  Therefore, significant wall space in the TEF may be required for primary protection of copper circuits.  All four TEF walls shall be covered by rigidly fixed, 3/4" trade size, non-combustible A/C grade plywood, void free, mounted 6” above the finished floor (AFF) to 8’6” AFF.  (To see a sample of A/C fire rated plywood, contact Strait Lumber 11150 E. Colfax Avenue, Aurora CO 303.366.3561; description: 4x8-23/32” AC Fire Retard Ply PLY34ACNC).  The A-side (smooth side) of the sheet shall be outward facing.

The A/C plywood shall be securely fastened to the wall and shall be painted with two coats of fire retardant white paint.  

8.  TEF design must conform to vibration requirements specified in TIA/EIA-569.

 

9.  The TEF lighting shall be a minimum of 500-lux (50 foot-candles) measured 1 meter from the finished floor and shall be mounted to meet the design configurations of the room.  Emergency lighting is recommended.  Lighting shall be placed to light the front and rear of the racks.

 

10.  The TEF door shall be a minimum of 36” wide and 80” high, without doorsill, hinged to open outward, and fitted with a lock compliant with ACTC and Facilities assigned key codes.   The TEF door shall also have an electronic lock.

 

11.  Floors, walls, and ceiling shall be treated and sealed to eliminate dust.  Finish shall be light in color to enhance room lighting.  Antistatic flooring materials shall be used.

 

12.  All TEF ceilings shall be open to structure; to provide space over the equipment frames for suspended cable trays or ladder racks.  Suspended cable trays and ladder racks are typically installed at 7’ AFF.  TEFs shall be free of false or suspended ceilings.  Ceiling protrusions (i.e. fire suppression sprinkler heads) must be placed to assure a minimum of 8 feet of clearance from the finished floor.

 

13. A dedicated electrical panel shall be placed in each TEF to support telecommunications equipment.  The panel shall be rated at 100 Amps or higher to facilitate future growth.  The panel may not be shared, it is for the exclusive use of the TEF’s equipment.  Emergency generator power is required for the TEF, if available in the project.  Label the panel per campus standard.

 

14.  A minimum of eight (8) dedicated, IG, unswitched 20A, 120-VAC duplex outlets, each on a separate circuit, shall be provided for equipment power at heights and locations specified by ACTC during the design phase.  These eight dedicated circuits shall be installed from above into the equipment racks as directed by ACTC.  Additional convenience duplex outlets, on a separate dedicated unswitched circuit, should be provided at 6’ intervals around the room. Install the convenience receptacles 15” AFF or as directed by ACTC.  Label all outlets to the campus standard.  Emergency generator power is required for the TEF, if available in the project.

 

15.  Sleeves or slots through walls and floors shall be fitted with approved re-enterable firestopping.  Applicable codes, standards, and specifications shall be enforced.

 

16.  Building backbone pathways connecting the TEF to TRs will require a minimum of four Trade Size 4” sleeves/conduits for interconnection, except where cable tray exists.  A minimum of two (2) spare conduits must be installed when the TEF is not vertically aligned from floor-to-floor to allow for lower fill ratios.

 

17.  Sprinkler heads shall be provided with wire cages to prevent accidental discharge.  Preaction sprinklers are preferred over wet pipe or dry pipe systems.  If wet pipe or dry pipe systems are employed, then drainage troughs shall be provided under the sprinkler heads and pipes to prevent leakage onto the TEF equipment.  High temperature heads are preferred. 

 

 

 

 

B.  Telecommunications Room (TR).

 

1.  A minimum of one TR shall be designated per floor and that TR shall be solely dedicated to telecommunications services.  Space shall not be shared with electrical installations other than those designed and intended for telecommunications.  TRs shall be vertically stacked to facilitate interconnection with the floors above and below. 

 

2.  The TR shall be dry and free from the danger of flooding.  The TR shall not be located where water ingress is possible or probable.  No water or drain piping shall be routed through the TR that is not associated with TR equipment. Steam, heat, and any other source of environmental hazard shall be avoided. 

 

3.  The minimum TR size is 10’ x 12’.  Ceiling open structure.  Variations in size shall be approved by ACTC on a case-by-case basis and will be dependent upon the floor size and applications to be served.

 

 

 

 

4.  TRs shall be designed to meet floor loading (minimum floor loading of 50 lbf/ft2) as specified in the references section. 

 

5.  TR location should not be adjacent to any source of EMI.  The TR shall be located away from sources of EMI at a distance which will reduce the interference to 3.0 V/m throughout the deployed frequency range.  Interference may not exceed 3.0 V/m throughout the usable bandwidth of the communications cabling.  Telecommunications bandwidth is up to 500 MHz.

 

6.  TRs require a temperature range from 64°F to 75°F (18°C to 24°C).  The desired non-condensing, relative humidity range is from 30% to 55%.  Humidifiers are not typically required in TRs.  Temperature sensors shall be configured for alarm reporting and HVAC support units shall be installed on emergency power.  A minimum of one air change per hour is required.  Typically, 20,000 BTUs of cooling are required in the TR.  Fan coil units are the required cooling source.

 

7.  All four TR walls shall be covered by. rigidly fixed, 3/4" trade size, non-combustible A/C grade plywood, void free, mounted 6” above the finished floor (AFF) to 8’6” (To see a sample of A/C fire rated plywood, contact Strait Lumber 11150 E. Colfax Avenue, Aurora CO 303.366.3561; description: 4x8-23/32” AC Fire Retard Ply PLY34ACNC).  The A-side (smooth side) of the sheet shall be outward facing.  The plywood shall be securely fastened to the wall and painted with white fire retardant paint. 

 

8.  TR design must conform to vibration requirements specified in TIA/EIA-569.

 

9.  The lighting shall be a minimum of 500-lux (50 foot-candles) measured 1 meter from the finished floor and shall be mounted to meet the design configurations of the room.  Emergency lighting is desired.  Lighting shall be placed to light the front and rear of the racks.

 

10.  The TR door shall be a minimum of 36” wide and 80” high, without doorsill, hinged to open outward, and fitted with a lock compliant with ACTC and Facilities assigned key codes.  The TR door shall also have an electronic lock.

 

11.  Floors, walls, and ceiling shall be treated and sealed to eliminate dust.  Finish shall be light in color to enhance room lighting.  Antistatic flooring materials shall be used.

 

12.  All TR ceilings shall be a minimum of 8' 6" high, unobstructed; to provide space over the equipment frames for suspended cable trays or ladder racks.  Suspended cable trays and ladder racks are typically installed at 7’ AFF in TRs. TRs shall be free of false or suspended ceilings.  Ceiling protrusions (i.e. fire suppression sprinkler heads) must be placed to assure a minimum of 8 feet of clearance from the finished floor.

 

13. A dedicated electrical panel shall be placed in each TR to support telecommunications equipment.  The panel shall be rated at 100 Amps or higher to facilitate future growth.  The panel may not be shared, it is for the exclusive use of the TR’s equipment.  Emergency generator power is required for all TRs, if available in the project.  Label the panel per campus standard.

 

14.  A minimum of eight (8) dedicated, IG, unswitched 20A, 120-VAC duplex outlets, each on a separate circuit, shall be provided for equipment power at heights and locations specified by ACTC during the design phase.  These eight dedicated circuits shall be installed from above into the equipment racks as directed by ACTC.  Additional convenience duplex outlets, on a separate dedicated unswitched circuit, should be provided at 6’ intervals around the room.  Additional convenience duplex outlets, on a separate dedicated unswitched circuit, should be provided at 6’ intervals around the room.  Install the convenience receptacles 15” AFF or as directed by IT Services.  Label all outlets to the campus standard.  Emergency generator power is required for each TR, if available in the project.

 

15.  Sleeves or slots through walls and floors shall be fitted with approved re-enterable firestopping.  Applicable codes, standards, and specifications shall be enforced. 

 

16.  Building backbone pathways connecting TR’s will require a minimum of four (4) Trade Size 4” sleeves/conduits for interconnection, except where cable tray exists.  A minimum of two (2) spare conduits must be installed when TR’s are not vertically aligned from floor-to-floor to allow for lower fill ratios.

 

17.  Sprinkler heads shall be provided with wire cages to prevent accidental operation.  Preaction sprinklers are preferred over wet pipe or dry pipe systems.  If wet pipe or dry pipe systems are employed, then drainage troughs shall be provided under the sprinkler heads and pipes to prevent leakage onto the TR equipment.  High temperature heads are preferred.

 

C.  Pathways.

 

1.  Cable Tray.

 

a. Ventilated, solid-sided continuous aluminum cable tray shall be used to provide horizontal pathways for station wiring.  Where cable tray is not possible (in renovation projects only), alternative pathways shall be provided, as approved by IT Services.  In these cases, cables must be supported every 48” to 60”. Wire Basket type tray may also be  acceptable – approve with project manager.

 

b.  ACTC requires 18“ or 24” cable tray (6” deep, with 9” rung spacing) in main corridors, with secondary runs supported by 12” or 18” cable tray (4” or 6” deep, with 9” rung spacing) as specified by AHEC.  The actual cable tray size depends upon the floor’s requirements.  The cable tray shall be continuous from end-to-end.

 

c.  Cable tray shall be supported and loaded in compliance with applicable electrical codes and recommended fill ratios per type or category of cable included in tray.

 

d.  A minimum of 12” access headroom shall be provided and maintained above the cable tray.  Access to cable tray should not be restricted.  

 

e.  A minimum of 3” of clear, vertical space shall be available above ceiling tiles.

 

f.  Cable tray shall not be installed higher than 11 feet AFF.

 

g.  Cable tray shall use factory T’s, sweeps, and interconnections.  The cable tray shall be continuous, without gaps, opening, or breaches.

 

h.  Cable tray shall be unbroken and suitably firestopped with re-enterable firestopping when passing through a firewall.  Trade Size 4” sleeves shall be required for connection of cable tray through walls.  Approved mechanical firestopping may be substituted for approved nonmechanical firestopping.  ACTC approves all firestopping substitutions.

 

i.  Cable tray shall be grounded and bonded to the TBB with a 6 AWG uninsulated conductor.  Bond every longitudinal cable tray component.

 

j.  Cable tray may be shared with all low voltage systems, as coordinated with AHEC.

                           

2.  J-hooks and conduit.

 

a.  A 2” minimum reamed and bushed conduit shall be provided from the cable tray to each room.  This entrance sleeve shall be shared by all low voltage systems entering the room.  A larger sleeve, as specified by IT Services, may be required depending upon the room’s size and low voltage requirements.  

 

b.  A 1” conduit shall be used to provide a pathway inside the wall to each work area outlet.  The conduit shall be stubbed out to the top of the wall and be physically oriented towards the floor’s cable tray.  The conduit end shall be reamed and bushed. 

 

c.  From the stubbed work area conduit, J-hooks shall be provided and installed by the cable installer to provide a pathway to the cable tray. 

 

1).  J-hook sizes available from ¾” up to 4”.   Preferred hook is Panduit J-Pro supports. These are non metallic, have a 1” bend radius, are rounded and will not damage cable as it’s pulled thru.  Also ul approved and suitable for air handling spaces.  Assembly attachments for any environment.  Full line cross available to Caddy. Available in red to differentiate security cable runs or other specialty cabling if needed.  Velcro straps slide thru the hook and secure cable bundles.

 

2).  J-hooks are required every 48” to 60” along the pathway. 

 

3).  Individual J-hooks may support no more than 50 cables. 

 

4).  J-hooks shall not be shared with other low voltage systems.  That is, all other low voltage systems require their own J-hook pathway.  J-hook support rods may be shared at pathway crossings or where approved by AHEC before hand. 

 

a).  When J-hook support rods are shared at crossings or at AHEC approved locations, a minimum clearance of 12” is needed between low voltage J-hooks and telecommunications J-hooks. 

 

b).  Telecommunications J-hooks shall be placed at the bottom of any shared support rod to facilitate frequent moves, adds, and changes.

 

5).  Telecommunications J-hook wire supports shall be distinguished by their Black color. These are fire retardant and meet plenum specifications. Red available for Fire alarm and security cabling.

 

6).  J-hook wire supports shall be secured at both ends as per NEC 300.11.

 

a)       If due to obstructions, limited access ceilings, or in clinical areas, conduit/tray may be used in lieu of J-hooks.  All conduit/tray runs shall be coordinated with and approved by AHEC.

 

1).  No section of conduit shall be more than 100’ in length or contain more than two 90° bends between pull boxes or pull points. 

 

2).  Boxes shall not be used in lieu of bends.  Electrical 90° elbows (type LB) are not permitted.  Corresponding conduit ends must be aligned within boxes. 

 

3).  All conduit ends shall be reamed and bushed. 

 

4).  Conduit shall comply with NEC and local codes, standards, and specifications.  AHEC may stipulate additional specifications as required.

 

5).  The bend radius for < 2” conduits should be 6 times the internal diameter of the conduit.  Conduits over 2” OD shall have a bend radius at least 10 times the internal diameter of the conduit.  Wide sweeps shall be used for all conduits over 2”.

 

6).  Polyline pull strings with a strength rating of 200 pounds shall be provided for all conduit runs.

 

3.  Work area outlets.  A work area telecommunications outlet shall be a four-plex, deep box with a single-gang mud ring unless otherwise specified during design.

 

4.  Building backbone.  Building backbone (riser) conduits shall be Trade Size 4” conduit, minimum.  Measured pulling tape shall be provided in all horizontal or vertical building backbone conduits.

 

D.  Telecommunications Grounding and Bonding.

 

1.  The TEF, TRs, and ERs require grounding and bonding.  ACTC does NOT require separate an isolated grounding system for its voice and data networks.  See Diagram below for reference.

 

 

 

 

2.  Each building shall have one Telecommunications Main Grounding Busbar (TMGB), which is bonded to the building’s electrical service entrance and is electrically contiguous to the Grounding Electrode Conductor (GEC).  The TGMB is usually located in a TEF, ER, or in an ACTC specified TR.  The TMGB shall be bonded to building structural steel, the entrance facility, and electrical service grounds with a minimum 6 AWG stranded copper. 

 

3.  Each TR shall have at least one Telecommunications Grounding Busbar (TGB), which is connected back to the TMGB via the Telecommunications Bonding Backbone (TBB). 

 

4.  The TMBG and TBG shall be made of copper and have the following minimum dimensions: 24” long, 4” wide, and ¼” thick.  The TMGB and TGB shall be drilled and tapped to accept standard NEMA compliant grounding hardware. Equipment grounds shall use a minimum 6 AWG stranded, insulated copper to the TMGB and TGB and be attached with standard NEMA compliant grounding hardware.  Telecommunications connections shall be at 3 Ohms or less.

 

5.  The minimum TBB conductor size is 6 AWG, but consideration shall be given to using 3/0 AWG conductor, as per the J-STD-607-A TBB sizing table shown below.

 

TBB Linear Length (Feet) TBB Size (AWG)
Less than 4 6
4 to 6 4
6 to 8 3
8 to 10 2
10 to 13 1
13 to 16 1/0
16 to 20 2/0
Greater than 20 3/0

 

5.  The TBB shall be installed in its own pathway, independent of the IP Services pathways. 

 

6.  A TBB may be an insulated conductor.  Each telecommunications bonding conductor (from equipment) shall be a 6 AWG insulated conductor, with distinctively green colored insulation.  The TBB used to bond cable tray shall be uninsulated, 6 AWG minimum.  TBBs shall be placed so they avoid bends, curves, and diverts.  Straight and linear TBB runs are required.

 

7.  Whenever two or more vertical TBBs are used in a multistory building, the TBBs shall be bonded together with a Grounding Equalizer (GE) at the building’s top floor and at a minimum of every third floor in between. 

 

8.  The TBB, GE, TMGB, and TGB shall be marked with nonmetallic labels, as specified by IT Services. 

 

E.  Equipment Room (ER).

 

1.  ERs are not required for most buildings; contact ACTC for need and placement. 

 

2.  Generally, each campus requires a minimum of one ER.  Buildings may require an ER if they are located at some significant distance from the (needs to be added above) nearest Communications Center in Arts, North, South, Central or Admin Classroom Building.  The ACTC will specify when an ER is required.  ERs shall be exclusively dedicated to telecommunications services.  ER space must not be shared with electrical services other than those designed and intended for telecommunications.  The ER should be centrally located to minimize the size and length of backbone cabling as well as provide easements and pathways for backbone and carrier services required of the room.  The room shall not be adjacent to any high -voltage electrical services or water mains.  A location should also be selected to allow for movement of large or heavy equipment.  Access to cable pathways are required.  ER walls should extend to structure and provide a sealed environment for equipment. 

 

3.  Consult TIA-942, Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard for Data Centers for ER design and implementation guidance.  ACTC desires that ERs be built within a Tier 2 (redundant components) to Tier 3 (concurrently maintainable) framework.

 

4.  The ER may also serve as the TEF facility for local exchange carriers (LEC) or competitive local exchange carrier (CLEC) where such a separate facility does not exist.  Adjacency to existing carrier entrance facilities is required.

 

5.  Sizing of ER will be calculated using area of service, types of service provided, and projections of growth.  ACTC design engineers will provide space requirements based on these factors.  The minimum size of an ER is 300 ft2. Working clearances of 3 feet must be provided for all scheduled and installed equipment.

 

6.  ERs may require access (raised) flooring to allow for the cable routing from cable vaults to equipment frames and PBX equipment.  Cable tray, or equivalent, must be provided for cable management under the raised floor, if provided. Finished floor height must be at least 12” from the sub-floor to accommodate the cable management systems.  The plenum area may be used for air handling for equipment cooling.  All metal parts of the raised floor must be bonded to ground.  Floor panels must be covered with high-pressure laminate or a durable, vinyl tile resistant to static electricity.

 

7.  Floor loading capacity shall be sufficient to bear both the distributed and concentrated load of the installed equipment.  The ER distributed loading shall be at least 100 lbf/ft2 and the concentrated loading must be at least 2000 lbf. Distributed floor loading may range as high as 350 lbf/ft2.

 

8.  ER design must conform to vibration requirements specified in TIA/EIA-569.

 

9.  The ER shall be dry and free from the danger of flooding.  The ER must not be located where water ingress is possible or probable.  No water or drain piping shall be routed through the ER that is not associated with ER equipment. Steam, heat, and any other source of environmental hazard shall be avoided.

 

10.  Water leak detection and alarming required.

 

11.  The floors, walls, and ceilings shall be treated and sealed to eliminate dust. 

 

12.  All four walls in the ER shall be covered by rigidly fixed, 3/4" trade size, non-combustible A/C grade plywood, void free, mounted 6” above the finished floor (AFF) to 8’6”    The A-side (smooth side) of the sheet shall be outward facing.  The A/C plywood shall be securely fastened to the wall and shall be painted with two coats of fire retardant white paint.  

 

13.  ER location should not be adjacent to any source of EMI.  Interference may not exceed 3.0 V/m throughout the usable bandwidth of the communications cabling.  Sources of EMI should be kept 3 meters from the ER. 

 

14.  ER doors shall be a minimum of 36” wide by 80” high.  Due to the nature of the equipment located in the ER, ERs require at least one oversized door (72” by 90”) to allow large equipment to be moved in or out.  Doors should open outward.  ER doors shall be secured with electronic access and a lockset specified by AHEC Facilities.

 

15.  ER ceilings shall be a minimum of 8' 6" high, unobstructed; to provide space over the equipment frames for suspended cable trays or racks.  ERs shall be free of false or suspended ceilings.  Ceiling protrusions (i.e. fire suppression) must be placed to assure a minimum of 8 feet of clearance from the finished floor.

 

16.  ERs require lighting with a uniform intensity of 500 lux (50 foot candles) when measured 1 meter above the finished floor.  Indirect lighting is not desired.  Connect lighting fixtures for ERs to separate electrical circuits from those that accommodate the equipment in the room.  To avoid blocking or filtering the light, do not place lighting equipment above equipment cabinets, termination frames, or other freestanding equipment.  Lighting shall be placed to light the front and rear of the racks.  Use a light colored finish to enhance room lighting.  Provide emergency lighting in ERs. 

 

17.  Specific circuits for equipment in ERs will be designated during the space planning process and shall be placed according to ACTC approved blueprints.  In addition to those circuits, additional electrical outlets are required in all ERs.  All such electrical outlets shall be grounded, non-switched, and separately fused.  ERs require one 120-VAC, 20-amp duplex receptacle per every 12 linear feet of wall space.  Emergency generator power is required for ERs.  UPS are also recommended, sized to handle a 10-minute outage.

 

18.  Temperature and moisture shall be controlled in all ERs.  Typical equipment room requirements are:

 

a.  Temperature range from 64° F to 75° F (18° C to 24° C);

 

b.  Relative humidity range from 30% to 55%; humidifiers are required in ERs;

 

c.  Heat dissipation of up to 30,000 BTUs per hour per cabinet.  Consider room cooling, row cooling, or rack cooling topologies to achieve this heat removal.  Cold and hot aisles are desired.  Temperature sensors shall be configured for alarm reporting and HVAC CRAC units shall be installed on emergency power.  Consult ACTC for ER cooling requirements.

 

19.  When copper cable services for any ER exceeds 1800 pairs, provide a separate room (cable vault) for cable splices.  This room should be sized according to the requirements of the facility and should be located adjacent to the ER with free pathways to terminating equipment and cross-connect fields. 

 

20.  The ER should support a three-phased fire detection and suppression system. 

 

a.      An air sampling fire detection system is required.  Intelligent very early smoke detection (VESD) is desired.  Contact AHEC for desired vendors of solutions already in use.

 

b.      An HFC-227ea (FE-227 or FM-200, FM-200 preferred) inert gas fire suppression agent is recommended. 

 

c.       A preaction water-based fire suppression sprinkler is requirement.  Such sprinkler systems should have cabinet troughs to prevent accidental water damage to the equipment.  The sprinklers should be caged or recessed and have high temperature valve fuse release heads.  Equipment power off should be initiated prior to water release to minimize water damage to equipment.

 

21.  Class C (or ABC) hand-held fire extinguishers shall be placed inside the ER.  Pull stations shall be placed at all doors.  EPO buttons are required at each door.  Label all stations to campus standards.  EPO buttons and pull stations shall have safe guard features to preclude accidental release.

 

22.  Fire stop penetrations (area around sleeves, drilled core floor openings, and cables) shall be sealed or plugged with an 8-to-1 ratio expandable urethane foam with a 1" thick topping of water plug cement or equivalent.  All unused sleeves must be plugged and capped with approved firestop.

 

 

 

3       Horizontal Infrastructure

 

3.1                                      General

 

Each subsystem provides a specific function in the typical AHEC cable plant system.  The facility subsystem provides the interconnection between buildings.  Each subsystem consists of:

 

  • Entrance facilities
  • Equipment rooms
  • Transmission media (wire and cable)
  • Cross-connects
  • Terminations
  • Racks    
  • Pathways

 

 

3.1.1 Twisted Pair Cable

 

The horizontal UTP cable shall meet or exceed specifications associated with Category 6 cable as outlined in the ANSI/TIA/EIA568B.2-1 Category 6 specification.  The characteristics of category 6 cable are specified up to 250 MHz.  It is intended to be used for voice and data transmission rates up to and including 1.2 gigabit. With additional adherence to TSB155, mitigation techniques can result in some ability to support up to 10 gigabit operation for less than 55 meters, dependent upon the quality, performance and installation practices.

 

3.1.2 Attenuation

 

The maximum attenuation shall be adjusted at elevated temperatures using a factor of 0.3% increase per degree Celsius for Category 6 cables.  The cable attenuation shall be verified at a temperature for 40C and 60C and shall meet the requirements above after adjusting for temperature.

 

3.1.3 Near End Cross-Talk (NEXT)

 

Near end crosstalk (NEXT) is a measure of noise coupling from the transmit pair into a receive pair.  NEXT performance significantly improves as you progress from Category 3 to 5, 5E and 6.  Category 6 NEXT is about 10 dB (3 times) better than Category 5.  NEXT is a serious impairment, as crosstalk coupling interferes directly with the received signal.  NEXT is the reason why installers must maintain proper twist ratios when terminating connections.  NEXT is measured for all six pair-to-pair combinations at both ends of the link.                                                                                                                       

 

3.1.4  Installation Requirements

 

During the installation of twisted pair cabling, there are several critical considerations that must be addressed by the cable installers to ensure that maximum information through-put can be attained.  The major installation requirements are:

 

Based on the EIA/TIA-568-B.1 Standard, the maximum distance between the MDF and any IDF (riser cable subsystem) should not exceed 90 meters (295 feet) for 150 ohm shielded twisted pair cable, and 800 meters (2,624 feet) for 100 ohm unshielded twisted cable pair.

 

Based on the EIA/TIA-568-B.1 Standard, the maximum distance for horizontal station cabling should be 90 meters (295 feet) from the IDF in which it terminates.

 

Cable installed in cable trays shall not be wire tied but must be neatly laid in.  If not installed in conduit, all cables shall be secured to a permanent wire hanger every 4 to 5 feet (staggered).  Under no circumstances should cable be tied to water sprinkler lines.  Cabling practices as published in TIA/EIA-568-B.1 and in BICSI TDMM shall be strictly enforced.

 

All horizontal station cabling should be routed at least 5” inches from any fluorescent light fixtures and at least 48 inches from any electric motors or other RF source.

 

All horizontal station cabling will be one (1) (voice only), two (2) or four (4) four-pair cables (work area outlet), depending on information outlet type, pulled simultaneously from the IDF to each information outlet.

 

All cable bundles shall be secured with “Velcro” (listed for the environment). Cable tie-wraps are no longer allowed. All terminations at the connector level shall be made with an IDC impact termination tool.

 

 

 

3.2  Cable Subsystem and Media Types

 

3.2.1  Entrance Facility “EF”

 

The Entrance Facility is generally located in the MDF at most facilities, when it is not located in the MDF it shall be referred to as the “EF”

 

The entrance facility consists of the telecommunications service entrance to the building, including the entrance point through the building wall, and continuing to the entrance facility.  The entrance facility may contain the backbone pathways that link to other buildings in campus situations.  CATV and antenna entrances may also constitute part of the entrance facility.

 

A service entrance pathway shall be provided for each physical building.  The basic methods for provisioning are underground, buried and aerial pathways.  In determining the total number of pathways required, the planner shall consider the following:

 

  • Type and use of building
  • Growth
  • Difficulty of adding pathways in the future
  • Alternate entrance
  • Type and size of cables likely to be installed
  • Requested Services
  • Multiple Service Providers

 

Diverse routing and pathway redundancy is required for a 24 hour stay facility, less than a 24 hour stay facility should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis with each construction project.

 

3.2.2  Main Distribution Frame “MDF”

 

The Main Distribution Frame (MDF) provides distributed communications through backbone cabling to all of the Building Distribution Frames (BDFs) and Intermediate Distribution Frames (IDFs) for the facility.  The MDF is the main interface with Telephone switches (PBX), LAN core equipment, other individual network switches, etc.

 

3.2.3  Telecommunications Room/Datacommunications Room/IDF

 

The Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) provides the transition from the backbone subsystem to the horizontal subsystem.  This room is used to distribute communication services to all work area outlets.  It will usually contain the termination hardware where circuits can be rearranged and rerouted.  It usually includes passive cross-connect components and space for active network electronic components such as, routers, switches and hubs.

 

The IDF(s) shall contain the mechanical terminations for a portion of the horizontal cable subsystem and a portion for the backbone subsystem.  In this usage, the IDF shall provide facilities (i.e. space, power, grounding, etc.) for the passive or active devices or both used to interconnect the two subsystems.  There is no upper limit on the number of IDF(s), which may be provided within a building. 

 

All Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cable terminations in the distribution frames are completed on approved connecting blocks (Refer to Appendix A).  Designation strips for cable pair identification shall be provided on all termination blocks. Use of system wire management accessories is required for a description of connector system components to be used (Refer to Appendix A). Horizontal cables shall be terminated in sequential order. Each horizontal cable will have its own individual number.

 

At the distribution frames, cross-connect wiring shall be standardized for each type of cross-connect that will be implemented. The category rating of cross-connect cabling should meet or exceed the specifications of the application being cross- connected.

 

IDF/TR locations will be provided in a manner that will support a station cable design where the maximum length of station cable runs shall be less than 295 feet (on average, station cable runs should be between 150 and 225 feet).

 

There shall be a minimum of one IDF/TR per floor. In a multi-floor building, the IDF’s/TR’s should be stacked vertically so backbone cabling distances may be kept as short as possible, and for ease in adding additional cabling. An IDF/TR services only that floor.

 

The IDF(s)/TR(s)  shall have enough space to house active network electronics.  Space for servers shall be provided in an alternate room, adjacent rooms are preferred.   If an alternate room can not be provided all servers will then have to be located in the MDF in a co-locate area. The goal is to provide a secure, environmentally controlled area for servers while not jeopardizing the security and liability in the IDF(s)/TR(s).  

 

For new construction and major remodeling, there should be one centrally located 10’ x 15’ IDF/TR for every 10,000 square feet of usable floor space with a minimum of 200 pair UTP riser, additional riser may be needed for densely populated areas. All passive and active electronic components shall be mounted in a standard 19” floor-mount rack. All four walls shall be covered with rigidly fixed ¾” trade size AC grade plywood, void free, 8 feet high, capable of supporting attached passive and active equipment. Plywood backboards shall be painted with two coats of fire retardant white paint.   False ceilings are not allowed.

 

 

3.2.4   ANSI/TIA/EIA 606-A Color Coding

 

Color                                                     Reserved for Identification of:

 

Orange -                Demarcation point (central office termination)

Green -                   Network connections on customer side of demarcation point

Purple -                 Termination of cables originating form common equipment (e.g.,PBX’s, computers, LAN’s, and multiplexers)

White -                   First level backbone

Gray -                     Second level backbone

Blue -                     Horizontal cable (IDF to work area)

Brown -                  Interbuilding backbone (cable connecting separate buildings, BDF)

Red -                       Key telephone systems

Yellow -                 Auxiliary circuits, alarms, miscellaneous circuits.

 

3.2.5   Backbone Subsystem

 

The Backbone Subsystem a term used in TIA/EIA documents and in BICSI refers to all communication cables from the Main Distribution Frame (MDF) to the Building Distribution Frame (BDF).  It should provide the highest rate of transmission for the facility.  This subsystem provides inter-building and intra-building connection facility.

 

The function of the backbone wiring is to provide interconnections between the MDF(s) and IDF(s), or interconnection between buildings BDF(s) on the same campus. 

 

Dedicated riser cable will be installed from the MDF(s) to each BDF and to each IDF on each floor.

 

Riser cable will consist of twisted-pair ARMM, fiber optic cabling and Series-11 (formerly RG-11) coax to each BDF and IDF, configured in a star topology for CATV applications where required.

 

All IDF fiber runs will consist of multiple strands of multimode and multiple strands of single-mode, preferably as a composite cable. AHEC is now utilizing Gigabit transmission in the backbone. Consideration must be given in regards to distance of the optical fiber. The distance for legacy 62.5/125 M/M fiber when utilizing one Gigabit transmission is 220 meters (721 ft). The Distance for Standard 62.5/125 M/M fiber is 300 meters (984 ft.) Standard 50/125 M/M will support up to 600 meters (1,968 ft), while Laser Optimized OM2/OM3 fiber will support 750/1000 meters respectively. If the distance is greater, then single-mode fiber shall be used. Gigabit Ethernet will not perform properly on legacy 62.5/125 multimode fiber over 220 meters. The ANSI/TIA/EIA568-B.3 standard recommends only 50 micron fiber laser optimized, (LOMMF/OM2/OM3) for 10 Gigabit Ethernet transmission and migration to the forthcoming 40/100 gigabit standard.

 

BDF backbone copper and fiber minimum requirements shall be determined by totaling the fiber and copper, which are fed between BDF and IDF’s, and dividing by two (2).  For example if there are four (4) IDF’s which each have 12 strands of multimode fiber totaling 48 strands, 24 strands will be provided between the MDF and BDF. This formula should be used for multi-mode and single-mode fiber.

 

Riser cable shall be ARMM-type cable composed of materials meeting the UL classifications for use in riser shafts without the need for conduit.  In addition, the riser cable must be rated for use as a riser cable per the National Electric Code 800-53 (B).

 

Fiber optic cable shall be certified to meet or exceed the current American National Standards Institute (ANSI) TIA/EIA568B.3 Standard. (delete old stand?)

 

Electrical Metal Tubing (EMT) conduit or cable tray, at a minimum, shall be used to house all backbone copper and fiber optic cable within a building, except in vertical riser shafts, in which steel sleeves shall be used as the routing shaft (see below). All backbone cable shall be secured to a permanent building fixture at intervals not to exceed every 10 feet.  Water sprinkler pipes shall never be used to secure or ground any cabling.  Discretion shall be used in the placement plan and installation of intra-building cabling to fully utilize already existing individual conduits and to avoid the need to install new.  A fully utilized conduit is at its maximum when it reaches a 50% not to exceed 60% fill ratio. (Unless manufactures requirements differ)

 

Backbone access holes between floors shall consist of four (4) inch steel (EMT as a minimum) sleeves.  These should extend between two (2) and four (4) inches above the floor to provide water protection.  After cables are installed, the sleeves must be appropriately fire stopped with, approved putty (see Fire Stops) this includes any unused sleeves.

 

Empty conduit will be supplied with pull cords, this will facilitate future pulls.  Fiber optic cable shall be housed in inner-duct, EMT conduit, or armor jacket, listed for the environment in which it is installed.

 

All newly installed conduits, cable trays and other pathways shall be used to support and protect only the communications cabling.  Under no circumstances shall electrical cabling be co-located within any conduit or raceway used to route communications cabling.

 

The installation of the cable should be as straight as possible.  Routing should be along hallways using adjacent walls of the corridors whenever possible, perpendicular to the building lines.  Routing should be in common areas wherever possible and areas of restricted access should be avoided.

 

No section of conduit shall be longer than 100 feet or contain more than two (2) 90º bends between pull points or pull boxes.

 

Pull or splice boxes shall be placed in an exposed manner and location, and readily accessible.  Pull boxes shall not be placed in a fixed false ceiling space unless immediately above a marked, hinged panel.  A pull box shall be placed in a conduit run where the length is over 100 ft, there are more than two (2) 90º bends, or if there is a reverse bend in the run.

 

Riser ARMM cables metallic sheath shall be bonded at each end to an approved ground.

 

The backbone cabling shall use the hierarchical star topology. Each horizontal cross-connect in a telecommunications room TR (IDF) is cabled either directly to a main cross-connect (MDF) or to an intermediate cross-connect (BDF), then to a main cross-connect (MDF). There shall be no more than two hierarchical levels of cross-connect in the backbone cabling. From the horizontal cross-connect, no more than one cross-connect shall be passed through to reach the main cross-connect (MDF). Therefore, connections between any two horizontal cross-connects shall pass through three or fewer cross-connect facilities.

 

3.2.6   Horizontal Subsystem

 

The Horizontal Subsystem is the portion of the wiring system that extends from the Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) to the outlet.  All work area outlet horizontal cable will be unshielded, Category 6, 24 AWG.  This cable must meet the performance specifications as defined in (Chapter 1.5). Horizontal cable shall be certified to meet or exceed the electrical performance specifications.

Cable installation and termination practices shall be in compliance with TIA/EIA 568-B.1 Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard Part 1: General Requirements Pair untwisting at termination shall not exceed .5 inches.  Kinks and sharp 90º bends are not allowed.  The minimum bend radius for Category 6 cable shall not be less than two (2) inches. All horizontal cable shall be installed without bridges, splices, or taps.

 

All horizontal cable in plenum return ceilings shall be plenum rated and must be classified as meeting the low flame spread and smoke producing characteristics of the National Electric Code, Section 800-53 (A), as determined by the Underwriters Laboratories. The local Authority Having Jurisdiction must approve cable jacket type no matter what environment it is being installed in prior to a Request For Quote being sent out for bid.

 

Typical work area outlets shall be of a modular design that will allow for the easy transition to other connector types as needed in the future.  Four (4) individual cables shall be pulled to each work area outlet in a star topology, with four (4) pairs per sheath. (Rooms will require one (1), two (2), and four (4) individual cable and jack configurations.)  Wall phone locations will typically use a single cable configuration with an 8 position jack in a stainless steel faceplate while most other locations will use the four-cable configuration and a four-jack faceplate.  All 8 conductors in each 4-pair cable shall be terminated on an 8 position modular jack. (See Appendix A) for approved recommended hardware. Communications cabling shall not be used until it has been tested.  All records and test results must be submitted electronically to the Account/Project Manager prior to the release of final payments.

 

Only the T568B pin configuration standard as specified in the EIA/TIA 568-B.1 standard will be supported.  All eight (8) conductors of the 8-position/8-conductor information outlet will be terminated.

 

All horizontal cables shall be installed with a minimum 6” to 8” slack behind each work area outlet to facilitate troubleshooting and repairs.  In addition 8’ to 10’ service slack shall be left above the ceiling at the IDF/TR.

 

 

 

 

3.2.7  Work Area Subsystem

 

The Work Area Subsystem refers to all communication cable from the outlet to the station equipment.  Work area wiring may vary in form depending on the application. Any area requiring communications related services must be considered.  All work area cordage must be factory terminated approved products.

 

3.2.8   Existing Building Renovations

 

All IDF’s/TR’s requiring more than 50% re-cabling for renovations shall be brought up to ACTC standards.  All renovations to IDF’s/TR’s, add, move, and change cabling not meeting the requirements to upgrade shall use Category 6 cable for all new dual/quad drops.

 

3.2.9   Pathways

 

Backbone pathways consist of intra-building and inter-building pathways.  Backbone pathways may be either vertical or horizontal.  Inter-building backbone pathways extend between buildings.  Intra-building pathways are contained within a building.  Alternate routing and pathway redundancy requirements for critical areas should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis with each construction project.  Backbone pathways shall comply with the TIA/EIA 569-B standard:

 

Horizontal pathways shall have two (2) 100mm (4 inch) steel (EMT at a minimum) sleeves, installed within each intermediate distribution frame, extending to an area above the access ceiling in the corridor to allow for routing and pulling of the horizontal runs.

 

All horizontal cables shall be routed above the ceiling grid so that a minimum distance of 5” is maintained between any cabling and fluorescent lighting fixtures, sources of electrostatic discharge, radiated frequency interference or areas of high electromagnetic radiation.  Installation areas that will not support this standard such as heavily ducted spaces above lighting or electrical sources of interference may require conduit or alternate routing.

 

All new construction shall utilize ventilated cable trays (wire basket type), routed within the hallway or corridor ceiling of the floor it will feed to allow for easier installation of horizontal runs. Minimum clearance shall be 12 inches on one side of the cable tray, 12 inches on the top of the cable tray, and 3 inches above finished ceiling to allow for the removal of tiles. Raised flooring systems should also utilize cable trays beneath the floor for proper communications cable management. Cable tray shall be used for all main horizontal pathways. The tray shall be the basket type such as Flextray, Cablofil or B-Line. The depth and width will vary depending on amounts of cabling being installed. Refer to the manufacturer’s installation guidelines for supports and fill.

 

All individual cable supports, when needed (J-hooks) shall be installed every 4’ to 5’ft staggered through open ceiling. Plenum rated “Velcro” shall be the only means of securing cable bundles.

 

All new construction should utilize ¾” or larger conduit stubs from each information outlet to accessible ceiling space and pointed horizontally toward cable tray utilizing a swept 90°, hallway or logical cable distribution point.  Outlet boxes shall be 4” square (4s box) and deep as possible with single-gang rings.

 

Wire molding shall be used to conceal all exposed horizontal cabling (i.e., surface mount information outlets).

 

Non-metallic flexible conduit with sweep 90° elbows shall be used to transition from floor pedestals, conduits or outlet boxes to furniture system baseboards and raceways.

 

 

3.2.10  Conduits

Completed wire/cable installations in conduit shall not exceed 50% fill ratio, not to exceed 60% finished loading factor of the available conduit space. All conduits entering offices shall start initially as 3/4" conduit attached to a 4" square box. Conduit run for 3/4" shall be no longer than 100 feet otherwise a J-box is required. A 3/4" pipe shall carry no more than four (4)  4-pair cables.

 

As per the ANSI/TIA/EIA 569-B Standard the following conduit fills shall apply

Conduit size                                           Number of Cat-6 Cables @ .220 diameter                           

 

¾”                                            4                                                              5                              _________________

1”                                            8                                                              8                                                               

1 ¼”                                         16                                                            15                                                           

1 ½”                                         20                                                            21                                                           

2”                                            36                                                            35                                                           

2 ½”                                         64                                                            50                                                           

4”                                            150                                                          133

 

 

 

In hard ceiling areas conduits shall stub up into the ceiling from the 4" box and route to the wire/cable tray. In a drop ceiling area conduits shall stub into the ceiling and have a swept 90º bend. Typical installations shall use a double or a single device plaster ring opening. Conduit between junctions shall not be smaller than 3/4". Conduit ends shall have compression type connectors with bushings. Setscrews are not approved.

There shall be no more than the equivalent of two  (2) 90º bends.

Example:  Two (2) 90º bends or any combination totaling 180º in a conduit run, without the installation of a pull box.

Bonding and grounding of backbone pathways and cables shall comply with  J-STD-607-A standards and applicable electric codes. 

3.3   Distance Limitations

 

Distance limitations should be considered with respect to cable type and application.  All subsystems, cross-connect wires and connection cables must be included in the entire cable length distance calculations.  Some distance limitations may be overcome by selecting more appropriate media.  If distance limitations are exceeded the support of future applications could be compromised.

 

Table 1:  Backbone Cable Distance Standards

 

The total length of transmission cable between the telecommunications closet or equipment room and the intermediate cross-connect (including to and from any intermediate cross-connects) depends upon the cable type used as shown below, as per TIA/EIA 568-B.1

 

HorizontalCross-Connect(HC) IntermediateCross-Connect(IC) to (BDF)Horizontal cross-connect (HC) (IDF) MainCross-Connect(MC) to (MDF)Intermediate cross-connect (IC) (BDF) TotalDistance (MDF to BDF to IDF)
62.5/125mm& 50/125mmOptical Fiber Cable 300 m (984 ft.)Max. 1,700m (5575 ft.)(See note 1) 2,000m (5575 ft.)(note 4)
100-OhmUTP Cable 300 m (984 ft.)Max. 500 m (1640 ft.)(See Note 2) 800 m (1640 ft.)(See Note 2)
100-OhmSTP Cable        (See note 3)
Single-Mode Fiber 300 m (984 ft.)Max. 2,700 m (8855 ft.) 3,000 m (8855 ft.)(note 4)

 

 

Note 1:  When the HC to IC distance is less than max., the IC to MC distance can be increased accordingly to a max. of 2,000 meters (6,560 ft.). The same note applies for Single mode with the distance limitation of 3000 meters (8855 ft.)

 

Note 2:  When the HC to IC distance is less than max., the IC to MC distance can be increased accordingly to a max. 800 meters (2,624ft.).

 

Note 3:  Recommended to a max. 90 meters (295ft.).  Total length between active equipment connections should not be greater than 100 meters (328ft.).

 

Note 4:  In the ever increasing demand for bandwidth the distance limitation for fiber has more dependents on application than core size. Refer to ANSI/TIA/EIA 568-B.1 Table E-1 (pg. 72) for distance limitation per application. See also 568-B.3 and 568-C.3.

 

 

This section under construction still….to add mnf spec. verbage and photos Chapter 4  - PRODUCT SECTION

 

4.1 General

A.        All materials and installation techniques used shall be per industry standards.

B.        All components provided shall have been thoroughly tested and proven in actual use.

C.        Product substitutions

1.        No deviations from the specified product manufacturer’s products will be allowed without prior approval from the ACTC committee.

2.        Contractor(s) may submit requests for approval of equal products or  materials.  Written requests shall be submitted to the project owner and design engineer for review within the specified time before the bid.

3.        No requests for substitutions will be considered after bid opening.

 

 

4.1.2  Fiber Optic cable types:

 

High data rate applications such as 10 Gigabit Ethernet and the forthcoming 40/100 Gbps Ethernet Standard have changed the way fiber optic cabling is being selected for premises networks.  The prevalent recommendations as specified in recently released standards in the last 3 years specify multimode, laser optimized 50/125 micron optical fiber (OM3), standard 50/125 micron and grandfathered 62.5/125 micron fiber for new and retrofit environments. Single-mode 8 -10 micron is also specified for expansive campus environments and some video and specialty applications. Hybrids of these are preferred by the committee.  These are the acceptable fiber types per ACTC standards and will be specifically identified in project specific documents as required.  Refer to msudenver.edu/actc (Network Construction standards and Network IT requirements and State of Colorado Technical Consultant recommendations on a project to project basis).  Add URL (Dave) the url is https://www.msudenver.edu/actc/ not sure why it doesn’t work?

 

4.1.3   Copper cable Types:

 

1Gbe, 10Gbe, 40/100Gbe, Video applications such as streaming video and teleconferencing, Multi-Megapixel surveillance cameras and emerging technologies such as PoE Plus are driving the adoption of Category 6a cabling as the recommended horizontal media to accommodate technology refreshes and the addition of these applications to the environment without the need for re-cabling and should be highly considered to help reduce the cost of ownership over time and ensure our cabling plant will support the proposed 20 year plan. Category 6 cabling is a minimum recommendation for VoIP and current data networking applications.   

 

 

4.2    Termination Hardware

 

4.2.1 General

 

The mechanical termination hardware is used to provide a means of connecting and cross-connecting wiring systems.  It also provides a means of connecting the building wiring system to the network equipment.

 

4.2.2 100 Ω ohm UTP

 

Transmission performance of UTP termination hardware must be consistent with the category of cables they terminate.  Performance requirements for Category 6 UTP connectors are documented in ANSI/TIA/EIA568B.2-1Category 6 specification. These requirements apply to, but are not limited to; work area outlets, patch panels, transition connectors and cross-connect blocks. New construction, major additions and renovations will require Enhanced Cat 6 cable to be used in plenum return spaces on plenum return air spaces. Moves, adds, and changes to existing facilities will use Standard Category 6. Check with local Electrical inspectors and local Fire Marshal before ordering any cable.

 

4.2.3 Mechanical Termination Hardware

 

It is desirable that hardware used to terminate UTP cable be of the insulation displacement connection (IDC type) and rated according to the cable category. 

 

Example:  Termination hardware for Category 6 UTP cable must be rated to support speeds up to 1.2 gigabit and support transmission rates of 250MHZ.

Termination hardware for Category 6a UTP cable must be rated to support speeds up to 10  gigabits per second and support transmission rates of 250MHZ,for 100 meter distances.

 

 Note that the same intermediate wire blocks may be utilized for both voice VoIP and data applications, where feasible.  In newly constructed IDF(s) Category 6 termination hardware will be installed in the 19” rack.  The data four (4) pair will be installed directly onto the 110 type termination hardware.

 

4.2.4 Cross-Connect and Patch Cords

 

The cross-connect jumpers and factory-terminated patch cords shall meet performance requirements and shall meet the requirements as specified in the ANSI/TIA/EIA568B.2-1Category 6 Specifications. Patch cords for new construction shall be RJ45 to 110. color coded preferred, colored labels if Cat 6a.

 

 

4.2.5 Removal of Abandoned cable

 

As per the 2004 and 2008 National Electrical Code 800-52 (B), 800-53 (B) (1), and 770-53(B) (1): Accessible portions of abandoned cables shall not be permitted to remain.

 

 

4.3  Uninterruptible Power Supplies: (UPS)

 

As more of the mission critical systems continue to converge on the IP Ethernet Enterprise, backing up these applications are required, The committee recommends mid mounted shelf UPS in each cabinet which contains critical network hardware. Solutions from Eaton Powerware, APC, Emmerson/Liebert for larger KVA apps and Tripplite or Minuteman have small to mid size solutions as well.

 

4.5  Work Area designs:

 

ACTC requires the design, manufacture, test, and installation of telecommunications cabling networks per manufacturer’s requirements and in accordance with NFPA-70 (2008 edition of the National Electrical Code®), IEEE C2 2007(NESC 2007), state codes, local codes, requirements of authorities having jurisdiction, and particularly the following standards:

  1. ANSI/NECA/BICSI-568-2006 -- Standard for Installing Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling

2.       ANSI/TIA/EIA 568-B Parts 1, 2 & 3 Commercial Building Cabling Standard

 

a)  The example below illustrates the solution orderable as a kit which includes the faceplate, four jacks of specific mnf. type and color, labels, screws and other items customized per requirement.  Kitting facilitates less labor for installation, less loss parts, reduces waste assisting in meeting Green/LEEDS requirements and improves time to install. All components are orderable under one single part number which eases ordering and paperwork for purchasing.

These kits are required for all bidders proposals.

 

Each jack will have its own individual cable number in sequential order. Different areas and classroom types will use one of these four work area kit design types listed below. 

 

EXAMPLE – Typical Kit use single gang faceplate with Series II dual enhanced Cat 6 jacks. Some applications may require specialty outlet types such as F connector for CATV or others. The drawings below detail requirements. Confirm components and design with project manager prior to purchase of kits for all projects.

 

 

b)       The preferred mnf solution is Ortronics NetClearGT2 Enhanced Category 6 with Series II system components including single gang faceplate installed on a dual gang box as pictured below:  Example only – all drops may not have all components pictured.  Trac-Jack style product and or GTX Augmented (Cat 6a) may also be used with ACTC approvals or where specified.

 

 

 

 

 

There are currently four types of cabling faceplate designs being utilized by the educational institutions. They are respectively:

 

c)       CIP Classroom Jack:  5 port Category 6/ data icon outlets – Kit Part number 387802

d)        Add Trac jack  option kit – White jacks with colored icons

e)       Add GTX Cat 6a option – White jacks with colored icons

 

 

 

f)        Computer LAB Jack:  6 port Category 6 data icon outlets – Kit Part number 387800

g)       Icons for specific services are all red (Data)

h)       Add Track Jack kit

i)         Add GTX Cat 6a kit

 

 

j)        Office Jack:  2 per room, one plate each on opposite walls or room.   Each with 2 ports of category 6 w/ red data icon (right) and yellow voice icon (left) outlets and blanks - Kit Part number 387801

k)       Add Trac Jack kit

l)         Add GTX Cat6a kit

 

 

 

 

 

m)     Lectern Jack:    3port Category 6 data icon outlets – Kit Part Number 388164

n)        Icons are as follows:  Violet (left), Blue (Right) and black (bottom).

o)       Add Trac Jack kit

p)       Add GTX Cat6a kit

 

Add Labeling scheme from old standard doc – please identify this?

 

Add cabling p/n’s and definitions  - Berk-Tek LANmark-1000 Enhanced Category 6 Cable . Horizontal cable color is yellow Cat 6.  Cat 6a color shall be TBD.

Patch cords – Colored cords are preferred for Category 6 systems, Category 6a will have colored labels to designate specific services.

Racks are CPI – 9’ is standard (add p/n) 7’ rack is applicable for specific projects (add P/n)  – confirm with project owner prior to purchase.

Vertical managers for 9’ are double sided, standard.  Two per rack.  Acceptable alternatives are: (add options)

Add horizontal options:  May be required on a per project basis.  CPI 2U wire managers for copper and fiber patch panels, 1U wire managers for switches. Confirm with project owner. (add options)

Fiber optics – Corning Cable Systems is our preferred manufacturer.  All fiber hardware is typically rack mounted, Model CCH-04U, unless specified otherwise on a per project basis. Terminations are typically LC.  SC connections may be specified or required on a per project basis.  Confirm with project owner.

Add p/n’s.

 

Chapter 5 – Documentation (to be added)

 

Chapter 6 - Environmental Considerations

 

6.1 Life Safety

 

Life safety code requirements are substantial in educational facilities.  Adequate corridor access, fire protection system operation and control of dust/dirt must be maintained at all times.  Doorways must be kept clear to allow movement of carts, wheelchairs, etc.  Dust can have a negative effect on some individuals and sensitive electronic equipment and thus dust abatement will be necessary.  Penetrations in firewalls must be fully sealed with approved materials. Orange Safety cones and caution tape MUST be used at all times when working in public access areas, to protect patients and employees.

 

6.2 Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

 

The MDF or BDF room will need to conform to the PBX and computer systems manufacturers’ specifications for temperature control, which generally will require the temperature to remain constant 64°F to 75°F. HVAC shall function properly 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. It should have dedicated HVAC equipment or access to the main HVAC delivery system.

 

The IDF’s should maintain a temperature 64°F to 75°F if they contain active network electronics. If the IDF does not contain active equipment the temperature should be 50°F to 95°F

 

HVAC shall be included in the design of wiring closets.  A positive pressure shall be maintained with 1 air change per hour.  Air-handling equipment must dissipate the heat generated by active devices and satisfy applicable building codes.

 

6.2.1 Humidity

 

Humidity should always be maintained at less than 85% in rooms with no active equipment.  If the room houses active equipment the humidity range should be 30% to 55% relative humidity.  Precautions shall be taken to guard against static in low humidity environments.  Static mats shall be installed in all wiring closets when required. Heat dissipation 750 to 5000 Btu per hour per cabinet. Additional environmental considerations for telecommunications equipment may require dust, and contaminant control also.

 

6.3 Lighting

 

Overhead lighting should be installed uniformly to supply at least 50-foot candles at a height of 3 feet above the floor.  Locate light fixtures a minimum of 8ft, 6” above the finished floors.  All IDF’s must have an internal light source and not rely on ambient light from outside for use by personnel.  Emergency lighting is recommended. 

 

6.4 Electrical Power

 

Each IDF should have at least two (2) four (4) isolated ground dedicated 20 amp, 110-volt ac duplex electrical outlets, each on separate circuits, for use by active electronics fed from overhead.  In addition, emergency duplex outlets shall be provided on three walls for use by wall mount equipment.  Power outlets located on the walls are to be located 18” above finished floor.

 

The MDF or BDF room will require special power considerations depending on the type of PBX and computer systems that are installed and how they are powered.

 

 

6.5 Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS)

 

Centralized UPS units shall be installed to provide regulated and continuous AC power to network equipment in equipment rooms, and all telecom (IDF/BDF/MDF) spaces. These units are typically located out of the equipment room because of total battery acid and HVAC requirements. The UPS electrical outlets in all MDF/BDF/IDF’s shall be gray in color.

 

6.6 Emergency Power

 

Emergency power should be provided to the input of the UPS units.  Equipment providing communication internally or to other buildings and sites, or for critical applications, shall be on UPS backed by emergency power.

6.7 Grounding/Bonding

 

Grounding practices shall be in compliance with the NFPA -70 (NEC 2008) (articles 800 and 250) and the Commercial Building Grounding and Bonding Requirements for Telecommunications, J-STD-607-A.  A separate and consistent grounding source (#6 AWG minimum) must be installed in each equipment room and IDF for use by the voice and data communications equipment that will be housed there. Rack and Equipment grounding jumpers are required for each rack or cabinet.  PBX equipment requires a separate ground than the main ground buss bar. Proper grounding of the systems is essential to the correct operation of all components and life expectancy.  It is important to note that ground resistance to any and all equipment connections shall not exceed .1ohms under any circumstances. All critical ground connectors shall be two (2) hole lugs, and non-critical connections shall be one (1) hole lugs. All metallic non current carrying components of the telecommunications infrastructure (i.e.: equipment racks, trays, cable shields etc.)  shall be bonded to the ground. 

 

6.8 Security

 

All rooms require controlled access with a keyless entry system or fitted lock using a master/sub-master key plan for the entire campus.  Unauthorized access to MDF/BDF/IDF rooms is prohibited and shall be strictly controlled by Campus Security, Facilities and I/T Management.

 

6.9 Fire Suppression

 

Provide dry pipe pre-action protection for the MDF. Install wire cages to prevent accidental operation of sprinkler heads.

 

The placement of a pre-action protection system must be out side of the room it is protecting. This eliminates the risk of water leakage in the equipment rooms.

 

6.9.1 Fire Seal

 

Should fire-barriers need to be penetrated during the installation of cabling, proper restoration to the original fire rating shall be followed. Each AHEC facility shall determine which product manufacture they will require; 3M, or STI EZ-Path.

 

Each penetration shall be labeled. The label shall identify the product manufacturer, UL listed assembly number, date, number of cables, and technicians name. Each technician installing the fire-stopping assemblies must have proof of training for that product. As a standard, AHEC requires a EZ-Path assembly to be used in all new construction through fire-barriers, however if the local Fire Marshall requires a “T” rating and it can not be achieved using a steel sleeve, then it is not required. All fire-barrier penetrations shall be identified on as-built drawings.

 

6.9.2       Safety

 Emergency systems Add Emergency phones and Wide Area Emergency Broadcast System – WEBS 

 

7.  Fiber Optics Installation Practices and Methods

 

7.1 General

 

All fiber optic cable shall conform to National Electrical Code Article 770, Optical Fiber Cables and Raceway. Cables installed within buildings shall be marked by the manufacturer with the appropriate certification code; OFCR and OFNR for non-plenum areas, or, OFNP and OFCP for plenum and other air-handling spaces.

 

AHEC intends to pull and/or install both multi-mode and single-mode fiber optic riser cable wherever feasible during any major cable installation project to support future data, voice, imaging, and video applications.  When a facility is installing twisted pair cable between the MDF and BDF and an IDF, both multi-mode and single-mode optical fiber should be pulled along with the UTP cabling.  Fiber and Copper should be installed in separate conduits. 

 

7.2 Multi-mode Cable

 

Multi-mode fiber optic cable shall be graded index with nominal 50/125 mm cord/cladding diameter and shall meet or exceed the requirements of ANSI/TIA/EIA -568-B.1 and 568-B.3

 

Optical fiber runs to IDF’s shall be minimum of twelve (12) strands, dual windowed, laser optimized multimode building cable, preferably as a composite cable with the single-mode fiber.  MDF to BDF runs shall be a minimum of twenty four (24) strands. Project manager shall provide final specifications on project to project basis.

 

7.3 Single-mode Cable         

 

Single-mode fiber optic cable shall be graded index nominal 8.7mm to 10.0mm core/cladding diameter with a tolerance of +/- 0.5mm at 1300nm. Single-mode optic fibers shall be Class IVa Dispersion-Unshifted Single-mode Optical Fibers and shall comply with ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.1 The maximum value of the dispersion slope at S shall be no greater than .093 ps/km-nm2. 

 

Wavelength Maximum Attenuation  
 1310nm &      1550nm 0.5dB/km Outside Plant cable(loose tube)
   1310nm &   1550nm         1.0dB/km Inside Plant cable(tight buffered)

 

 

Optical fiber runs to IDF’s if specified, shall be twelve (12) strands, dual windowed, single-mode building cable, preferably as a composite cable with the 12 strands of multi-mode fiber.  MDF to BDF runs shall be a minimum of twelve (12) strands. Project manager shall provide final specifications on project to project basis.

 

 

7.4 Fiber Optic Splicing

 

Optical fiber splices, fusion or mechanical, shall not exceed a maximum optical attenuation of 0.3dB when measured in accordance with ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7 & -526-14.  All attempts should be made to avoid the need to make a fiber-to-fiber field splice.  Inter-building fiber optic cable may only be spliced when lengths exceed one (1) kilometer or splicing when OSP cable enters a building and a transition to ISP cable is needed.

Note: The method of splicing must be approved by AHEC and be in accordance with the manufactures approved methods.

 

7.4.1 Terminations

 

When constructing any new MDF, IDF, BDF, all new fiber optic cables (single-mode and multimode) are to be terminated with “LC” - Confirm this connector type - or SC?

Type connectors. When new fiber is installed from an existing MDF to a new IDF/BDF the connectors shall be “LC” at both ends. If additional fiber is being added to an IDF, then match the existing connector type. Terminations shall not exceed a maximum optical attenuation of 0.75dB when measured in accordance with ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7 (SM) & -526-14 (MM). All attenuation measurements shall be in accordance with specifications stated in ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7 & -526-14.

 

7.4.2 Testing

 

All multi-mode fiber optic shall undergo several tests, both before and after installation.  Prior to installation, all fiber optic strands on each reel shall be tested at 850nm and 1300nm (multi-mode) and at 1310nm and 1550nm (single-mode).  All results should be equal to or better than the specifications listed above. All test results are to be provided to AHEC prior to installation.  Any reel containing fiber strands that do not meet this criteria shall be replaced by the provider. 

 

Upon completion of the fiber terminations, the Vendor shall perform 100 percent of the fiber strands test as follows – Horizontal fiber runs (if installed) 850nm one direction only. Intrabuilding backbone – Both wavelengths, one direction (at a minimum). Interbuilding – Both wavelengths, bi-directional. All Intrabuilding fiber shall be tested (at a minimum) with Light source and power meter. Interbuilding fiber shall be tested with light source and power meter, as well as an OTDR.

Adhere to all test requirements outlined in Testing Appendix add reference number.

 

7.4.3 Innerduct

 

All fiber optic cables shall be installed in innerduct unless fiber is encased in an armor sheath.  All innerduct shall be properly rated for the environment, plenum or non-plenum. Innerduct shall be installed on one side of either vertical ladder rack or horizontal raceway.  On vertical raceway, the Innerduct shall be secured every two feet at a minimum.  On horizontal raceway, the innerduct shall be secured every six (6) feet at a minimum. All Innerduct shall be listed for the environment that it is installed in.

 

8.  Data Centers

 

8.1 Twisted Pair Cable

All horizontal copper cabling shall be a Category 6a rated cable where distances exceed 37 meters.  If Category 6 cable is used, cabling must follow the TSB 155 mitigation techniques to ensure optimal performance. Testing with a Level IIIe tester must be completed. Pre –Terminated copper solutions may also be used as long as all components are of a single source mnf.

 

8.2     Fiber Optic Cable and terminating hardware

Pre-terminated fiber solutions may be used, specifically MTP trunks and harnesses designed for reducing real estate in racks and cabinets

 

 

10.  Specific use/Tenant Office Buildings - Shall we keep this section?

10.1 General

 

Establish guidelines for Specific Use Office Building communications infrastructure and provide a clear demarcation point between AHEC and the tenant spaces.

 

10.2 Cable system common services.

 

Each subsystem provides a specific function in the typical AHEC Cable plant system.  The facility subsystem provides the interconnection from building entrances to each floor. Each floor shall have a minimum of one IDF space as defined in section 3.  Each subsystem consists of:

 

  • Entrance facilities
  • Equipment rooms
  • Riser Cables
  • Cross-connects

 

10.3 Service considerations will be determined on the following factors to properly plan the size and types of communication needs.

 

  • Type and use of the building
  • Growth potential
  • Difficulty of adding pathways in the future
  • Alternate entrance
  • Requested tenant services
  • Type and size of cables likely to be installed
  • Multiple service providers

 

10.4 Connectivity

 

AHEC will provide voice and data connectivity from the floor IDF/TR to the outside entrance facility. The tenant’s responsibility is from the floor IDF/TR to their individual suite. All station cables (horizontal cables) shall remain consolidated within the tenant’s suite and only feeder cables from their suite to the IDF will be accepted into the floor IDF.  It is recommended that the tenant follow the AHEC ITS Plan within their suite to insure high quality and trouble free service. Installing Category6 / 6a cable will protect your cable investment and adapt to future technologies for many years.